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Transcriptomics and methylomics in chronic periodontitis with tobacco use: a pilot study

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, August 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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19 Mendeley
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Title
Transcriptomics and methylomics in chronic periodontitis with tobacco use: a pilot study
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13148-017-0381-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Young-Dan Cho, Pil-Jong Kim, Hong-Gee Kim, Yang-Jo Seol, Yong-Moo Lee, Young Ku, In-Chul Rhyu, Hyun-Mo Ryoo, Cho, Young-Dan, Kim, Pil-Jong, Kim, Hong-Gee, Seol, Yang-Jo, Lee, Yong-Moo, Ku, Young, Rhyu, In-Chul, Ryoo, Hyun-Mo

Abstract

Accumulating evidence suggests that tobacco smoking affects the susceptibility to and severity of chronic periodontitis. Epigenetics may explain the role of smoking in the development and progress of periodontal disease. In this study, we performed transcriptomic and methylomic analyses of non-periodontitis and periodontitis-affected gingival tissues according to smoking status. Human gingival tissues were obtained from 20 patients, including non-smokers with and without periodontitis (n = 5 per group) and smokers with and without periodontitis (n = 5 per group). Total RNA and genomic DNA were isolated, and their quality was validated according to strict standards. The Illumina NextSeq500 sequencing system was used to generate transcriptome and methylome datasets. Comprehensive analysis, including between-group correlation, differential gene expression, DNA methylation, gene set enrichment, and protein-protein interaction, indicated that smoking may change the transcription and methylation states of extracellular matrix (ECM) organization-related genes, which exacerbated the periodontal condition. Our results suggest that smoking-related changes in DNA methylation patterns and subsequent alterations in the expression of genes coding for ECM components may be causally related to the increased susceptibility to periodontitis in smokers as they could influence ECM organization, which in turn may have an effect on disease characteristics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 16%
Student > Master 2 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 5%
Librarian 1 5%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 8 42%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 3 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Engineering 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 9 47%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 August 2017.
All research outputs
#6,654,896
of 11,623,235 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#347
of 539 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#128,749
of 265,946 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#11
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,623,235 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 539 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,946 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.