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Ancient DNA reveals elephant birds and kiwi are sister taxa and clarifies ratite bird evolution

Overview of attention for article published in Science, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
28 news outlets
blogs
14 blogs
twitter
177 X users
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
77 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
11 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
video
1 YouTube creator

Citations

dimensions_citation
228 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
466 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Ancient DNA reveals elephant birds and kiwi are sister taxa and clarifies ratite bird evolution
Published in
Science, May 2014
DOI 10.1126/science.1251981
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kieren J Mitchell, Bastien Llamas, Julien Soubrier, Nicolas J Rawlence, Trevor H Worthy, Jamie Wood, Michael S Y Lee, Alan Cooper

Abstract

The evolution of the ratite birds has been widely attributed to vicariant speciation, driven by the Cretaceous breakup of the supercontinent Gondwana. The early isolation of Africa and Madagascar implies that the ostrich and extinct Madagascan elephant birds (Aepyornithidae) should be the oldest ratite lineages. We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of two elephant birds and performed phylogenetic analyses, which revealed that these birds are the closest relatives of the New Zealand kiwi and are distant from the basal ratite lineage of ostriches. This unexpected result strongly contradicts continental vicariance and instead supports flighted dispersal in all major ratite lineages. We suggest that convergence toward gigantism and flightlessness was facilitated by early Tertiary expansion into the diurnal herbivory niche after the extinction of the dinosaurs.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 177 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 466 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 2%
New Zealand 6 1%
Brazil 6 1%
Germany 3 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Chile 2 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 435 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 95 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 77 17%
Student > Bachelor 58 12%
Student > Master 55 12%
Professor 22 5%
Other 80 17%
Unknown 79 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 248 53%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 40 9%
Environmental Science 29 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 26 6%
Social Sciences 4 <1%
Other 33 7%
Unknown 86 18%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 435. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2024.
All research outputs
#66,279
of 25,703,943 outputs
Outputs from Science
#2,438
of 83,249 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#453
of 240,722 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#23
of 871 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,703,943 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 83,249 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 65.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,722 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 871 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.