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Cellular Prion Protein Protects from Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Pain, January 2011
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Title
Cellular Prion Protein Protects from Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain
Published in
Molecular Pain, January 2011
DOI 10.1186/1744-8069-7-59
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vinicius M Gadotti, Gerald W Zamponi

Abstract

Cellular prion protein (PrPC) inhibits N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Since NMDA receptors play an important role in the transmission of pain signals in the dorsal horn of spinal cord, we thus wanted to determine if PrPC null mice show a reduced threshold for various pain behaviours.We compared nociceptive thresholds between wild type and PrPC null mice in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, in the presence and the absence of a NMDA receptor antagonist. 2-3 months old male PrPC null mice exhibited an MK-801 sensitive decrease in the paw withdrawal threshold in response both mechanical and thermal stimuli. PrPC null mice also exhibited significantly longer licking/biting time during both the first and second phases of formalin-induced inflammation of the paw, which was again prevented by treatment of the mice with MK-801, and responded more strongly to glutamate injection into the paw. Compared to wild type animals, PrPC null mice also exhibited a significantly greater nociceptive response (licking/biting) after intrathecal injection of NMDA. Sciatic nerve ligation resulted in MK-801 sensitive neuropathic pain in wild-type mice, but did not further augment the basal increase in pain behaviour observed in the null mice, suggesting that mice lacking PrPC may already be in a state of tonic central sensitization. Altogether, our data indicate that PrPC exerts a critical role in modulating nociceptive transmission at the spinal cord level, and fit with the concept of NMDA receptor hyperfunction in the absence of PrPC.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 4%
Unknown 44 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 26%
Researcher 10 22%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Professor 4 9%
Student > Master 3 7%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 3 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 30%
Neuroscience 8 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 13%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 4 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 August 2011.
All research outputs
#10,042,450
of 12,552,259 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Pain
#332
of 464 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#69,358
of 88,915 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Pain
#15
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,552,259 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 464 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.