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A Monte Carlo study for the calculation of the average linear energy transfer (LET) distributions for a clinical proton beam line and a radiobiological carbon ion beam line

Overview of attention for article published in Physics in Medicine & Biology, May 2014
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Title
A Monte Carlo study for the calculation of the average linear energy transfer (LET) distributions for a clinical proton beam line and a radiobiological carbon ion beam line
Published in
Physics in Medicine & Biology, May 2014
DOI 10.1088/0031-9155/59/12/2863
Pubmed ID
Authors

F Romano, G A P Cirrone, G Cuttone, F Di Rosa, S E Mazzaglia, I Petrovic, A Ristic Fira, A Varisano

Abstract

Fluence, depth absorbed dose and linear energy transfer (LET) distributions of proton and carbon ion beams have been investigated using the Monte Carlo code Geant4 (GEometry ANd Tracking). An open source application was developed with the aim to simulate two typical transport beam lines, one used for ocular therapy and cell irradiations with protons and the other for cell irradiations with carbon ions. This tool allows evaluation of the primary and total dose averaged LET and predict their spatial distribution in voxelized or sliced geometries. In order to reproduce the LET distributions in a realistic way, and also the secondary particles' contributions due to nuclear interactions were considered in the computations. Pristine and spread-out Bragg peaks were taken into account both for proton and carbon ion beams, with the maximum energy of 62 MeV/n. Depth dose distributions were compared with experimental data, showing good agreement. Primary and total LET distributions were analysed in order to study the influence of contributions of secondary particles in regions at different depths. A non-negligible influence of high-LET components was found in the entrance channel for proton beams, determining the total dose averaged LET by the factor 3 higher than the primary one. A completely different situation was obtained for carbon ions. In this case, secondary particles mainly contributed in the tail that is after the peak. The results showed how the weight of light and heavy secondary ions can considerably influence the computation of LET depth distributions. This has an important role in the interpretation of results coming from radiobiological experiments and, therefore, in hadron treatment planning procedures.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 102 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 2 2%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Greece 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 95 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 31%
Researcher 32 31%
Student > Master 9 9%
Other 6 6%
Student > Postgraduate 5 5%
Other 12 12%
Unknown 6 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 61 60%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 10%
Engineering 4 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Computer Science 3 3%
Other 6 6%
Unknown 15 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 May 2014.
All research outputs
#3,058,996
of 4,507,509 outputs
Outputs from Physics in Medicine & Biology
#437
of 844 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,437
of 106,306 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Physics in Medicine & Biology
#14
of 21 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 844 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.8. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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