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Socioenvironmental conditions and intestinal parasitic infections in Brazilian urban slums: a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo, August 2017
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2 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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76 Mendeley
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Title
Socioenvironmental conditions and intestinal parasitic infections in Brazilian urban slums: a cross-sectional study
Published in
Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo, August 2017
DOI 10.1590/s1678-9946201759056
Pubmed ID
Authors

Caroline Ferraz Ignacio, Milena Enderson Chagas da Silva, Natasha Berendonk Handam, Maria de Fatima Leal Alencar, Adriana Sotero-Martins, Martha Macedo de Lima Barata, Antonio Henrique Almeida de Moraes Neto

Abstract

A cross-sectional study covering an agglomeration of urban slums was conducted between 2015 and 2016 using participants observation, a socioeconomic survey, and the spontaneous sedimentation method with three slides per sample to analyze fresh stool specimens ( n =595) searching for intestinal parasites. Endolimax nana ( n =95, 16.0%) and Entamoeba coli ( n =65, 10.9%) were the most frequently identified agents, followed by Giardia intestinalis ( n =24, 4.0%) and Ascaris lumbricoides ( n =11, 1.8%). Coinfections caused by E. nana and E. histolytica/dispar and by Entamoeba coli/A. lumbricoides were significant. The use of piped water as drinking water, the presence of A. lumbricoides , and contamination with coliform bacteria and Escherichia coli were more common in major area (MA) 1. Children (0-19 years) had a greater chance of living in poverty (OR 3.36; 95% CI: 2.50- 4.52; p <0.001) which was pervasive. The predominance of protozoa parasites suggests that a one-size-fits-all approach focusing on preventive chemotherapy for soil-transmitted helminths is not appropriate for all communities in developing countries. It is important that both residents and health professionals consider the socioenvironmental conditions of urban slums when assessing intestinal parasitic infections for disease control and health promotion initiatives.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 76 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 13 17%
Student > Master 11 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 12%
Researcher 5 7%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Other 15 20%
Unknown 18 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 7%
Social Sciences 5 7%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 24 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 November 2020.
All research outputs
#11,248,824
of 19,476,606 outputs
Outputs from Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo
#243
of 430 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#110,863
of 234,813 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo
#3
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,476,606 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 430 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,813 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.