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Do adult mental health services identify child abuse and neglect? A systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#2 of 1,093)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
195 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
37 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
99 Mendeley
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Title
Do adult mental health services identify child abuse and neglect? A systematic review
Published in
International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, August 2017
DOI 10.1111/inm.12369
Pubmed ID
Authors

John Read, David Harper, Ian Tucker, Angela Kennedy

Abstract

Child abuse and neglect play a causal role in many mental health problems. Knowing whether users of mental health services were abused or neglected as children could be considered essential for developing comprehensive formulations and effective treatment plans. In the present study we report the findings of a systematic review, using independent searches of three databases designed to discover how often mental health staff find out whether their clients were abused or neglected as children. Twenty-one relevant studies were identified. Most people who use mental health services are never asked about child abuse or neglect. The majority of cases of child abuse or neglect are not identified by mental health services. Only 28% of abuse or neglect cases identified by researchers are found in the clients' files: emotional abuse, 44%; physical abuse, 33%; sexual abuse, 30%; emotional neglect, 17%; and physical neglect, 10%. Between 0% and 22% of mental health service users report being asked about child abuse. Men and people diagnosed with psychotic disorders are asked less than other people. Male staff ask less often than female staff. Some improvement over time was found. Policies compelling routine enquiry, training, and trauma-informed services are required.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 195 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 99 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 99 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 15%
Researcher 14 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 11%
Student > Bachelor 8 8%
Other 23 23%
Unknown 14 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 34 34%
Social Sciences 14 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Other 7 7%
Unknown 21 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 227. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2020.
All research outputs
#86,399
of 17,104,078 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Mental Health Nursing
#2
of 1,093 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,968
of 280,781 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Mental Health Nursing
#1
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,104,078 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,093 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,781 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.