Publication metrics and success on the academic job market

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, February 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Readers on

mendeley
312 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Publication metrics and success on the academic job market
Published in
Current Biology, February 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2014.04.039
Pubmed ID
Authors

van Dijk D, Manor O, Carey LB, David van Dijk, Ohad Manor, Lucas B. Carey

Abstract

The number of applicants vastly outnumbers the available academic faculty positions. What makes a successful academic job market candidate is the subject of much current discussion [1-4]. Yet, so far there has been no quantitative analysis of who becomes a principal investigator (PI). We here use a machine-learning approach to predict who becomes a PI, based on data from over 25,000 scientists in PubMed. We show that success in academia is predictable. It depends on the number of publications, the impact factor (IF) of the journals in which those papers are published, and the number of papers that receive more citations than average for the journal in which they were published (citations/IF). However, both the scientist's gender and the rank of their university are also of importance, suggesting that non-publication features play a statistically significant role in the academic hiring process. Our model (www.pipredictor.com) allows anyone to calculate their likelihood of becoming a PI.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 364 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 312 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 25 8%
Germany 10 3%
United Kingdom 8 3%
France 4 1%
Netherlands 4 1%
Sweden 3 <1%
Spain 3 <1%
Switzerland 3 <1%
Japan 3 <1%
Other 21 7%
Unknown 228 73%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 106 34%
Student > Ph. D. Student 89 29%
Student > Bachelor 22 7%
Other 17 5%
Professor 15 5%
Other 63 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 151 48%
Psychology 30 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 28 9%
Neuroscience 19 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 4%
Other 71 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 493. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 January 2017.
All research outputs
#6,263
of 7,278,168 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#71
of 6,436 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#128
of 172,097 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#1
of 126 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,278,168 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,436 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 172,097 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 126 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.