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Characterization of Primary Organic Aerosol from Domestic Wood, Peat, and Coal Burning in Ireland

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, September 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
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Title
Characterization of Primary Organic Aerosol from Domestic Wood, Peat, and Coal Burning in Ireland
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, September 2017
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.7b01926
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chunshui Lin, Darius Ceburnis, Stig Hellebust, Paul Buckley, John Wenger, Francesco Canonaco, André Stephan Henry Prévôt, Ru-Jin Huang, Colin O’Dowd, Jurgita Ovadnevaite

Abstract

An Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) was deployed to study the primary non-refractory submicron particulate matter emissions from burning of commercially available solid fuels (peat, coal, and wood) typically used in European domestic fuel stoves. Organic mass spectra (MS) from burning wood, peat, and coal were characterized and inter-compared for factor analysis against ambient data. The reference profiles characterized in this study were used to estimate the contribution of solid fuel sources, along with oil combustion, to ambient pollution in Galway, Ireland using the multilinear engine (ME-2). During periods influenced by marine air masses, local source contribution had dominant impact and non-sea spray primary organic emissions comprised 88% of total organic aerosol mass, with peat burning found to be the greatest contributor (39%), followed by oil (21%), coal (17%), and wood (11%). In contrast, the resolved oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) dominated the aerosol composition in continental air masses, with contributions of 50%, compared to 12% in marine air masses. The source apportionment results suggest that the use of domestic solid fuels (peat, wood, and coal) for home heating is the major source of evening/night-time particulate pollution events despite their small use.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 18%
Researcher 5 15%
Student > Master 4 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 9 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 12 36%
Chemistry 3 9%
Engineering 2 6%
Physics and Astronomy 1 3%
Energy 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 12 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 August 2018.
All research outputs
#7,918,001
of 14,995,047 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#10,368
of 14,534 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,595
of 272,056 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#135
of 233 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,995,047 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,534 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.6. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,056 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 233 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.