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Low birth weight: causes and consequences

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, September 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#44 of 378)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
119 Mendeley
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Title
Low birth weight: causes and consequences
Published in
Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, September 2013
DOI 10.1186/1758-5996-5-49
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carlos Antonio Negrato, Marilia Brito Gomes

Abstract

During our phylogenetic evolution we have selected genes, the so called thrifty genes, that can help to maximize the amount of energy stored from every consumed calorie. An imbalance in the amount of stored calories can lead to many diseases. In the early 80's the distinguished English epidemiologist David Barker, formulated a hypothesis suggesting that many events that occur during the intrauterine life and early in infancy can influence the occurrence of many diseases that will develop in adulthood. This theory proposes that under-nutrition and other insult or adverse stimulus in utero and during infancy can permanently change the body's structure, physiology and metabolism. The lasting or lifelong effects of under-nutrition will depend on the period in the development at which it occurs. The clues that led Barker to his conclusions started to be discovered when he was studying the temporal trends in the incidence of ischemic heart disease in England and Wales. Examining data found in The Hertfordshire records, collected in the beginning of the last century, he found that the rates of mortality by ischemic heart disease was much higher in children born in less affluent counties and mostly in those with low birth weight. After his initial findings a myriad of diseases have been found to be linked to low birth weight and under-nutrition in utero and in the neonatal period. These diseases were then nominated adult diseases with fetal origin. Epidemiological studies that led to these findings suggest that in utero and early postnatal life have critical importance for long-term programming of health and disease, opening unique chances for primary prevention of chronic diseases.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 119 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Unknown 117 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 40 34%
Student > Bachelor 22 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 11%
Researcher 12 10%
Unspecified 11 9%
Other 21 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 45 38%
Nursing and Health Professions 22 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 11%
Unspecified 13 11%
Social Sciences 6 5%
Other 20 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 June 2014.
All research outputs
#1,468,093
of 12,443,702 outputs
Outputs from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#44
of 378 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,097
of 191,188 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#3
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,443,702 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 378 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 191,188 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.