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Executive functioning in Cornelia de Lange syndrome: domain asynchrony and age-related performance

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, August 2017
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Title
Executive functioning in Cornelia de Lange syndrome: domain asynchrony and age-related performance
Published in
Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s11689-017-9208-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Donna Reid, Jo Moss, Lisa Nelson, Laura Groves, Chris Oliver

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine executive functioning in adolescents and adults with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) to identify a syndrome and age-related profile of cognitive impairment. Participants were 24 individuals with CdLS aged 13-42 years (M = 22; SD = 8.98), and a comparable contrast group of 21 individuals with Down syndrome (DS) aged 15-33 years (M = 24; SD = 5.82). Measures were selected to test verbal and visual fluency, inhibition, perseverance/flexibility, and working memory and comprised both questionnaire and performance tests. Individuals with CdLS showed significantly greater impairment on tasks requiring flexibility and inhibition (rule switch) and on forwards span capacity. These impairments were also reported in the parent/carer-rated questionnaire measures. Backwards Digit Span was significantly negatively correlated with chronological age in CdLS, indicating increased deficits with age. This was not identified in individuals with DS. The relative deficits in executive functioning task performance are important in understanding the behavioural phenotype of CdLS. Prospective longitudinal follow-up is required to examine further the changes in executive functioning with age and if these map onto observed changes in behaviour in CdLS. Links with recent research indicating heightened responses to oxidative stress in CdLS may also be important.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 33%
Student > Master 3 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Student > Bachelor 2 11%
Researcher 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 8 44%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 11%
Social Sciences 2 11%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 August 2017.
All research outputs
#10,317,115
of 11,632,136 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
#232
of 250 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#222,822
of 263,827 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
#7
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,632,136 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 250 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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