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Comparative ultrastructural hepatic alterations induced by free and liposome-encapsulated mefenamic acid

Overview of attention for article published in Ultrastructural Pathology, August 2017
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Title
Comparative ultrastructural hepatic alterations induced by free and liposome-encapsulated mefenamic acid
Published in
Ultrastructural Pathology, August 2017
DOI 10.1080/01913123.2017.1349850
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qais Bashir Jarrar, Muhammad Nazrul Hakim, Manraj Singh Cheema, Zainul Amiruddin Zakaria

Abstract

Mefenamic acid (MFA) is used as an anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, and antipyretic agent for treatment of a wide range of pathological disorders. While the uncertainty of its safety and the poor oral bioavailability constitute the major limiting factors of its medical use, considerable efforts including liposomal encapsulation are needed to achieve maximum therapeutic advantages. The current work was conducted to investigate the ultrastructural alterations in the liver induced by free MFA and its liposomal preparation. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with daily oral doses of either free MFA or MFA entrapped in Tween 80 inoculated liposomes at the concentration of 80 mg/kg for 28 days. Ultrathin sections were prepared from biopsies taken from the liver of each member of all animals under study and subjected to examination by transmission electron microscopy. The liver of rats that were exposed to liposomal MFA showed more ultrastructural alterations than the rats treated with the free drug. While both groups of rats demonstrated sinusoidal dilatation, Kupffer cell hyperplasia, mitochondrial damage, and nuclear alterations, rats treated with liposome-encapsulated MFA induced an increase in the multiple lysosomes formation, hepatocytic steatosis, and apoptotic activity than free MFA-treated rats. The ultrastructural findings of the present study indicate that the use of liposomal MFA induces more hepatic damage than the use of free MFA.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 10%
Student > Bachelor 1 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 10%
Unknown 4 40%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 3 30%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 20%
Engineering 1 10%
Unknown 4 40%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 August 2017.
All research outputs
#20,444,703
of 22,999,744 outputs
Outputs from Ultrastructural Pathology
#230
of 292 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#277,223
of 317,366 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ultrastructural Pathology
#8
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,999,744 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 292 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.