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Breaking down the barriers: a qualitative study to understand child oral health in refugee and migrant communities in Australia

Overview of attention for article published in Ethnicity & Health, April 2014
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Title
Breaking down the barriers: a qualitative study to understand child oral health in refugee and migrant communities in Australia
Published in
Ethnicity & Health, April 2014
DOI 10.1080/13557858.2014.907391
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elisha Riggs, Lisa Gibbs, Nicky Kilpatrick, Mark Gussy, Caroline van Gemert, Saher Ali, Elizabeth Waters

Abstract

Objective Australia is an increasingly multicultural nation. Never before has the dental workforce been exposed to such language, cultural, religious and ethnic diversity. There is evidence that refugee and migrant children experience significantly poorer oral health than the nonmigrant population. However, little is known about the oral health knowledge, practices and beliefs of parents with young children from refugee and migrant backgrounds. The aim of this study was to identify the sociocultural influences on child oral health in these communities. Design Participatory and qualitative research methods were utilised. Partnerships were established with community agencies representing migrants from Iraq, Lebanon and Pakistan. Focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews were conducted with community members. Qualitative data were analysed thematically, combining focus group and interview data. Results Over 100 women participated in focus groups (n = 11) and semi-structured interviews (n = 7). Key findings included the knowledge, beliefs and practices concerning: caries risk factors, oral health practices and oral health literacy. Despite mothers' knowledge of the major causes of poor oral health - dietary changes, confusion about child oral hygiene practices and limited oral health literacy all influenced child oral health outcomes. Conclusion This culturally competent qualitative study explores the sociocultural factors influencing child oral health in refugee and migrant communities. Understanding and acknowledging these factors are a prerequisite to determining where and how to intervene to improve oral health. Furthermore, it has implications for both dental and non-dental health professionals working to reduce health inequalities within such communities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 120 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 117 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 14%
Student > Bachelor 17 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 12%
Researcher 12 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 9%
Other 31 26%
Unknown 18 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 37 31%
Social Sciences 17 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 11%
Business, Management and Accounting 7 6%
Psychology 7 6%
Other 15 13%
Unknown 24 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2014.
All research outputs
#2,185,013
of 3,908,982 outputs
Outputs from Ethnicity &amp; Health
#64
of 114 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,446
of 97,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ethnicity &amp; Health
#3
of 5 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 114 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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