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Expression of fatty acid sensing G-protein coupled receptors in peripartal Holstein cows

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, March 2017
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Title
Expression of fatty acid sensing G-protein coupled receptors in peripartal Holstein cows
Published in
Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40104-017-0150-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alea Agrawal, Abdulrahman Alharthi, Mario Vailati-Riboni, Zheng Zhou, Juan J. Loor

Abstract

G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), also referred as Free Fatty Acid Receptors (FFAR), are widely studied within human medicine as drug targets for metabolic disorders. To combat metabolic disorders prevalent in dairy cows during the transition period, which co-occur with negative energy balance and changes to lipid and glucose metabolism, it may be helpful to identify locations and roles of FFAR and other members of the GPCR family in bovine tissues. Quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) of subcutaneous adipose, liver, and PMNL samples during the transition period (-10, +7, and +20 or +30 d) were used for expression profiling of medium- (MCFA) and long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) receptors GPR120 and GPR40, MCFA receptor GPR84, and niacin receptor HCAR2/3. Adipose samples were obtained from cows with either high (HI; BCS ≥ 3.75) or low (LO; BCS ≤ 3.25) body condition score (BCS) to examine whether FFAR expression is correlated with this indicator of health and body reserves. Supplementation of rumen-protected methionine (MET), which may improve immune function and production postpartum, was also compared with unsupplemented control (CON) cows for liver and blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) samples. In adipose tissue, GPR84 and GPR120 were differentially expressed over time, while GPR40 was not expressed; in PMNL, GPR40 was differentially expressed over time and between MET vs. CON, GPR84 expression differed only between dietary groups, and GPR120 was not expressed; in liver, GPCR were either not expressed or barely detectable. The data indicate that there is likely not a direct role in liver for the selected GPCR during the transition period, but they do play variable roles in adipose and PMN. In future, these receptors may prove useful targets and/or markers for peripartal metabolism and immunity.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 25%
Professor 6 19%
Student > Master 5 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 13%
Researcher 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 38%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 9%
Chemistry 2 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 6 19%
Unknown 6 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 August 2017.
All research outputs
#7,256,301
of 11,653,629 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology
#103
of 226 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,481
of 263,152 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology
#4
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,653,629 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 226 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,152 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.