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Acute and delayed protective effects of pharmacologically induced hypothermia in an intracerebral hemorrhage stroke model of mice

Overview of attention for article published in Neuroscience, November 2013
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Title
Acute and delayed protective effects of pharmacologically induced hypothermia in an intracerebral hemorrhage stroke model of mice
Published in
Neuroscience, November 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2013.07.052
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. Wei, J. Sun, J. Li, L. Wang, C.L. Hall, T.A. Dix, O. Mohamad, L. Wei, S.P. Yu

Abstract

Hemorrhagic stroke, including intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), is a devastating subtype of stroke; yet, effective clinical treatment is very limited. Accumulating evidence has shown that mild to moderate hypothermia is a promising intervention for ischemic stroke and ICH. Current physical cooling methods, however, are less efficient and often impractical for acute ICH patients. The present investigation tested pharmacologically induced hypothermia (PIH) using the second-generation neurotensin receptor (NTR) agonist HPI-201 (formerly known as ABS-201) in an adult mouse model with ICH. Acute or delayed administrations of HPI-201 (2mg/kg bolus injection followed by 2 injections of 1mg/kg, i.p.) were initiated at 1 or 24h after ICH. HPI-201 induced mild hypothermia within 30 min and body and brain temperatures were maintained at 32.7 ± 0.4°C for at least 6h without causing observable shivering. With the 1-h delayed treatment, HPI-201-induced PIH significantly reduced ICH-induced cell death and brain edema compared to saline-treated ICH animals. When HPI-201-induced hypothermia was initiated 24h after the onset of ICH, it still significantly attenuated brain edema, cell death and blood-brain barrier breakdown. HPI-201 significantly decreased the expression of matrix metallopeptidase-9 (MMP-9), reduced caspase-3 activation, and increased Bcl-2 expression in the ICH brain. Moreover, ICH mice received 1-h delayed HPI-201 treatment performed significantly better in the neurological behavior test 48 h after ICH. All together, these data suggest that systemic injection of HPI-201 is an effective hypothermic strategy that protects the brain from ICH injury with a wide therapeutic window. The protective effect of this PIH therapy is partially mediated through the alleviation of apoptosis and neurovascular damage. We suggest that pharmacological hypothermia using the newly developed neurotensin analogs is a promising therapeutic treatment for ICH.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 10%
Unknown 19 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 19%
Researcher 3 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Other 4 19%
Unknown 2 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 24%
Computer Science 1 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Psychology 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 4 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 June 2014.
All research outputs
#2,308,637
of 4,507,280 outputs
Outputs from Neuroscience
#1,096
of 2,344 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,089
of 107,934 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuroscience
#19
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,280 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,344 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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