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Dementia, walking outdoors and getting lost: incidence, risk factors and consequences from dementia-related police missing-person reports

Overview of attention for article published in Aging & Mental Health, June 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#30 of 1,783)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
50 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
159 Mendeley
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Title
Dementia, walking outdoors and getting lost: incidence, risk factors and consequences from dementia-related police missing-person reports
Published in
Aging & Mental Health, June 2014
DOI 10.1080/13607863.2014.924091
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eleanor Bantry White, Paul Montgomery

Abstract

Objectives: To estimate incidence, identify consequences and potential risk factors for harm in people with dementia who got lost in one UK policing region. Methods: In a retrospective observational study, data were extracted from missing-person records over a four-year period in one UK policing region (population of 2.1 million). Results: Two hundred and eighty-one incidents of getting lost were identified. Incidence of getting lost was estimated at 0.5% of the regional dementia population. Fifty-nine percent of reports came from domestic settings, 29% from care homes/hospitals, and 12% on excursions from home. Five percent (n = 15) sustained significant harm, including two deaths. Average age was 78 years (SD 8.3). Harm was associated with older age (mean difference 6.16 years, CI 1.86 to 10.46, p = 0.005, t = 2.82), length of time missing (Mdn time 2.48 hours; IQR 0.97 to 9.45, p = 0.02), and season (9% winter, 2% summer, p = 0.006). The length of time missing increased with delays in reporting to police (r = 0.15, p = 0.018), getting lost at night (Mdn time 1.70 hours, IQR 0.52-3.32, p = 0.028), driving themselves (Mdn time 2.45 hours, IQR 0.42-2.00, p = 0.001), and using public transport (Mdn 1.78 hours, IQR 1.07-3.92, p = 0.001). Conclusion: Incidence in this study suggests getting lost is a low-frequency event for people with dementia but for a small minority, the risks are considerable. Exploratory analyses suggest individual and environmental factors increase the risk of harm. Suitable methods need to be developed to replicate these findings in larger prospective samples. A focus on the predictors of harm may aid development of assessment protocols to ensure intervention is proportionate.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 159 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
Unknown 157 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 24 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 14%
Student > Master 22 14%
Student > Bachelor 16 10%
Student > Postgraduate 13 8%
Other 24 15%
Unknown 38 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 24 15%
Psychology 22 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 11%
Engineering 5 3%
Other 28 18%
Unknown 44 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 98. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 January 2023.
All research outputs
#368,496
of 23,035,022 outputs
Outputs from Aging & Mental Health
#30
of 1,783 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,479
of 229,915 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Aging & Mental Health
#2
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,035,022 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,783 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,915 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.