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Current Status and Future Prospects of Marine Natural Products (MNPs) as Antimicrobials

Overview of attention for article published in Marine Drugs, August 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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80 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
187 Mendeley
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Title
Current Status and Future Prospects of Marine Natural Products (MNPs) as Antimicrobials
Published in
Marine Drugs, August 2017
DOI 10.3390/md15090272
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alka Choudhary, Lynn Naughton, Itxaso Montánchez, Alan Dobson, Dilip Rai

Abstract

The marine environment is a rich source of chemically diverse, biologically active natural products, and serves as an invaluable resource in the ongoing search for novel antimicrobial compounds. Recent advances in extraction and isolation techniques, and in state-of-the-art technologies involved in organic synthesis and chemical structure elucidation, have accelerated the numbers of antimicrobial molecules originating from the ocean moving into clinical trials. The chemical diversity associated with these marine-derived molecules is immense, varying from simple linear peptides and fatty acids to complex alkaloids, terpenes and polyketides, etc. Such an array of structurally distinct molecules performs functionally diverse biological activities against many pathogenic bacteria and fungi, making marine-derived natural products valuable commodities, particularly in the current age of antimicrobial resistance. In this review, we have highlighted several marine-derived natural products (and their synthetic derivatives), which have gained recognition as effective antimicrobial agents over the past five years (2012-2017). These natural products have been categorized based on their chemical structures and the structure-activity mediated relationships of some of these bioactive molecules have been discussed. Finally, we have provided an insight into how genome mining efforts are likely to expedite the discovery of novel antimicrobial compounds.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 187 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 187 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 30 16%
Student > Master 29 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 14%
Researcher 19 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 4%
Other 29 16%
Unknown 45 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 36 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 36 19%
Chemistry 22 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 15 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 3%
Other 18 10%
Unknown 54 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 May 2018.
All research outputs
#12,483,637
of 20,597,902 outputs
Outputs from Marine Drugs
#1,328
of 3,155 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#147,726
of 287,957 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Marine Drugs
#19
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,597,902 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,155 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,957 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.