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Strain differences in the neurochemical response to chronic restraint stress in the rat: Relevance to depression

Overview of attention for article published in Pharmacology, Biochemistry & Behavior, February 2011
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Title
Strain differences in the neurochemical response to chronic restraint stress in the rat: Relevance to depression
Published in
Pharmacology, Biochemistry & Behavior, February 2011
DOI 10.1016/j.pbb.2010.11.012
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cliona M. O'Mahony, Gerard Clarke, Sinead Gibney, Timothy G. Dinan, John F. Cryan

Abstract

The neurochemical basis of depression focuses on alterations in the monoaminergic and amino acid neurotransmitter systems. Moreover, decreases in serum levels of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have led to the more recent neurotrophic hypothesis of depression. Chronic stress is one of the major predisposing factors to developing the disorder and thus we investigated the impact of chronic restraint stress on the levels of several neurotransmitters and their metabolites in a genetic animal model of depression, the Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat. Behavioural analysis of WKY rats indicated both a depressive and anxiety-like phenotype compared to their Sprague Dawley (SD) controls. WKY animals showed similar stress-induced decreases in hippocampal GABA, noradrenaline and dopamine as their SD counterparts while exhibiting a divergent decrease in 5-HT, 5-HIAA and DOPAC. WKY rats also showed a stress-dependent increase in GABA concentrations in the amygdala compared to the SD animals. Moreover, WKY but not SD rats had a chronic stress-induced decrease in serum BDNF levels. Together these data show that there are specific strain-dependent changes in neurotransmitter and neurotrophin levels in response to chronic stress which may predispose WKY animals to a depressive-like phenotype.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 1%
Malaysia 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Ireland 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
India 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Argentina 1 1%
Unknown 82 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 24%
Researcher 17 19%
Student > Bachelor 12 13%
Student > Master 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 15 17%
Unknown 8 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 20 22%
Neuroscience 17 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 7%
Psychology 5 6%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 13 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 August 2011.
All research outputs
#12,859,182
of 19,463,333 outputs
Outputs from Pharmacology, Biochemistry & Behavior
#2,291
of 2,854 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#74,196
of 107,682 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pharmacology, Biochemistry & Behavior
#18
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,463,333 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,854 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 107,682 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.