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Physicians’ perception of generic and electronic prescribing: A descriptive study from Jordan

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, June 2014
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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25 Mendeley
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Title
Physicians’ perception of generic and electronic prescribing: A descriptive study from Jordan
Published in
Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, June 2014
DOI 10.1186/2052-3211-7-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Faris El-Dahiyat, Reem Kayyali, Penelope Bidgood

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate Jordanian physicians' perception and attitudes toward generic medicines and generic substitution. It also aimed to examine factors that affect physicians' pattern of prescribing, and to evaluate their opinion regarding future introduction of Electronic Prescribing (EP) in Jordan. A cross-sectional descriptive study involving Jordanian physicians working in both public and private sectors was undertaken, using a self-administrated anonymous questionnaire. Frequency tables, cross-tabulation and chi square tests were used for data analysis. The response rate was 75.2% (n = 376/500). Cost was claimed to be an important factor in the prescribing decision for 69.1% of the Jordanian physicians. The majority of physicians (77.4%) claimed that they often prescribe generic medicines. Jordanian physicians predominantly welcomed the implementation of an EP and International Nonproprietary Name (INN) prescribing systems with 92%, and 80.1% respectively. More than two thirds of the physicians (69.4%) accepted generic substitution by pharmacists, with a significant association with their employment sector; physicians who work in the private sector tended to oppose generic substitution compared with physicians who work in the public sector. Physicians mostly (72.1%) opposed that generic substitution should only be allowed upon patient request. Jordanian physicians have a positive attitude towards generic medications and high willingness and acceptance of strategies that encourage generic utilisation such as EP, INN prescribing and generic substitution. All these strategies would help reduce the high expenditure on medicines in Jordan. These findings would provide baseline data to policy makers to develop a robust generic policy to achieve greater clinical effectiveness and economic efficiency from medicines prescribing.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 24%
Other 3 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Researcher 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Other 6 24%
Unknown 3 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 28%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 8%
Engineering 2 8%
Social Sciences 2 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 8%
Other 6 24%
Unknown 4 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 April 2015.
All research outputs
#1,242,913
of 5,030,622 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#27
of 76 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,351
of 122,944 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#2
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,030,622 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 63rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 76 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 122,944 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.