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PAH Concentrations in Lake Sediment Decline Following Ban on Coal-Tar-Based Pavement Sealants in Austin, Texas

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, June 2014
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
twitter
2 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
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Title
PAH Concentrations in Lake Sediment Decline Following Ban on Coal-Tar-Based Pavement Sealants in Austin, Texas
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, June 2014
DOI 10.1021/es405691q
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter C. Van Metre, Barbara J. Mahler

Abstract

Recent studies have concluded that coal-tar-based pavement sealants are a major source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in urban settings in large parts of the United States. In 2006, Austin, TX, became the first jurisdiction in the U.S. to ban the use of coal-tar sealants. We evaluated the effect of Austin's ban by analyzing PAHs in sediment cores and bottom-sediment samples collected in 1998, 2000, 2001, 2012, and 2014 from Lady Bird Lake, the principal receiving water body for Austin urban runoff. The sum concentration of the 16 EPA Priority Pollutant PAHs (∑PAH16) in dated core intervals and surficial bottom-sediment samples collected from sites in the lower lake declined about 44% from 1998-2005 to 2006-2014 (means of 7980 and 4500 μg kg(-1), respectively), and by 2012-2014, the decline was about 58% (mean of 3320 μg kg(-1)). Concentrations of ∑PAH16 in bottom sediment from two of three mid-lake sites decreased by about 71 and 35% from 2001 to 2014. Concentrations at a third site increased by about 14% from 2001 to 2014. The decreases since 2006 reverse a 40-year (1959-1998) upward trend. Despite declines in PAH concentrations, PAH profiles and source-receptor modeling results indicate that coal-tar sealants remain the largest PAH source to the lake, implying that PAH concentrations likely will continue to decline as stocks of previously applied sealant gradually become depleted.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 5%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 34 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 38%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 14%
Other 4 11%
Professor 2 5%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 1 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 17 46%
Chemistry 4 11%
Engineering 4 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 5%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 4 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 57. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 January 2016.
All research outputs
#120,730
of 7,012,411 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#239
of 6,913 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,091
of 172,403 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#15
of 246 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,012,411 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,913 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 172,403 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 246 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.