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No apparent gain from continuing migration for more than 3000 kilometres: willow warblers breeding in Denmark winter across the entire northern Savannah as revealed by geolocators

Overview of attention for article published in Movement Ecology, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#14 of 184)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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70 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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47 Mendeley
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Title
No apparent gain from continuing migration for more than 3000 kilometres: willow warblers breeding in Denmark winter across the entire northern Savannah as revealed by geolocators
Published in
Movement Ecology, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40462-017-0109-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mathilde Lerche-Jørgensen, Mikkel Willemoes, Anders P. Tøttrup, Katherine Rachel Scotchburn Snell, Kasper Thorup

Abstract

For most Afro-Palearctic migrants, particularly small songbirds, spatiotemporal migration schedules and migratory connectivity remain poorly understood. We mapped migration from breeding through winter of one of the smallest Afro-Palearctic migrants, the willow warbler Phylloscopus trochilus, using geolocators (n = 15). Birds migrated from North European breeding grounds to West Africa via the Iberian Peninsula following a narrow corridor along the West Coast of Africa. Birds then dispersed across the northern Savannah with termination of migration highly variable among individuals. The termination of migration appeared not to be related to timing, current and previous years' vegetation conditions or biometrics. During winter, most birds moved southwards to improved vegetation. The willow warblers showed a large, unexpected longitudinal spread in winter sites of more than 3000 km between individuals breeding within a 500 m range resulting in a low degree of connectivity. The large wintering area may well be related to generalist behaviour in the species. Our findings contribute to understanding the link between breeding and wintering ecology in long-distance migratory birds.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 70 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 30%
Student > Master 8 17%
Student > Bachelor 7 15%
Researcher 6 13%
Other 3 6%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 5 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 66%
Environmental Science 5 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Computer Science 1 2%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 42. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2018.
All research outputs
#463,113
of 14,515,611 outputs
Outputs from Movement Ecology
#14
of 184 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,278
of 268,954 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Movement Ecology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,515,611 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 184 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,954 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them