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Oestrogens and progestins for preventing and treating postpartum depression

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, October 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
69 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
174 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Oestrogens and progestins for preventing and treating postpartum depression
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, October 2008
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd001690.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cindy-Lee Dennis, Lori E Ross, Andrew Herxheimer

Abstract

Postpartum depression is a common complication of childbirth, affecting approximately 13% of women. A hormonal aetiology has long been hypothesised due to the sudden and substantial fluctuations in concentrations of steroid hormones associated with pregnancy and the immediate postpartum period. There is also convincing evidence that oestrogens, progestins, and related compounds have important central nervous system activity at physiological concentrations. The primary objective of this review was to assess the effects of oestrogens and progestins, including natural progesterone and synthetic progestogens, compared with placebo or usual antepartum, intrapartum, or postpartum care in the prevention and treatment of postpartum depression. We searched The Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register (June 2004), the Cochrane Depression Anxiety and Neurosis Group trials register (July 2004), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (July 2004), MEDLINE (1966 to 2004), EMBASE (1980 to 2004), and CINAHL (1982 to 2004). We scanned secondary references and contacted experts in the field. All published and unpublished randomised controlled trials comparing an oestrogen and progestin intervention with a placebo or usual antepartum, intrapartum, or postpartum care among pregnant women or new mothers recruited within the first year postpartum. Two review authors participated in the evaluation of methodological quality, data extraction, and data analysis. Results are presented using relative risk for categorical data and weighted mean difference for continuous data. Two trials, involving 229 women, met the selection criteria. Norethisterone enanthate, a synthetic progestogen, administered within 48 hours of delivery was associated with a significantly higher risk of developing postpartum depression. Oestrogen therapy was associated with a greater improvement in depression scores than placebo among women with severe depression. Synthetic progestogens should be used with significant caution in the postpartum period. The role of natural progesterone in the prevention and treatment of postpartum depression has yet to be evaluated in a randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Oestrogen therapy may be of modest value for the treatment of severe postpartum depression. Its role in the prevention of recurrent postpartum depression has not been rigorously evaluated. Further research is warranted.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 174 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 <1%
Ireland 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 170 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 33 19%
Researcher 22 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 13%
Student > Bachelor 19 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 10%
Other 41 24%
Unknown 20 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 63 36%
Psychology 38 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 6%
Social Sciences 8 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 3%
Other 20 11%
Unknown 28 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 December 2019.
All research outputs
#3,915,957
of 15,335,820 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#6,450
of 11,169 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,766
of 189,662 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#127
of 209 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,335,820 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,169 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.0. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,662 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 209 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.