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Aboveground Allometric Models for Freeze-Affected Black Mangroves (Avicennia germinans): Equations for a Climate Sensitive Mangrove-Marsh Ecotone

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, June 2014
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Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

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97 Mendeley
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Title
Aboveground Allometric Models for Freeze-Affected Black Mangroves (Avicennia germinans): Equations for a Climate Sensitive Mangrove-Marsh Ecotone
Published in
PLOS ONE, June 2014
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0099604
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael J. Osland, Richard H. Day, Jack C. Larriviere, Andrew S. From

Abstract

Across the globe, species distributions are changing in response to climate change and land use change. In parts of the southeastern United States, climate change is expected to result in the poleward range expansion of black mangroves (Avicennia germinans) at the expense of some salt marsh vegetation. The morphology of A. germinans at its northern range limit is more shrub-like than in tropical climes in part due to the aboveground structural damage and vigorous multi-stem regrowth triggered by extreme winter temperatures. In this study, we developed aboveground allometric equations for freeze-affected black mangroves which can be used to quantify: (1) total aboveground biomass; (2) leaf biomass; (3) stem plus branch biomass; and (4) leaf area. Plant volume (i.e., a combination of crown area and plant height) was selected as the optimal predictor of the four response variables. We expect that our simple measurements and equations can be adapted for use in other mangrove ecosystems located in abiotic settings that result in mangrove individuals with dwarf or shrub-like morphologies including oligotrophic and arid environments. Many important ecological functions and services are affected by changes in coastal wetland plant community structure and productivity including carbon storage, nutrient cycling, coastal protection, recreation, fish and avian habitat, and ecosystem response to sea level rise and extreme climatic events. Coastal scientists in the southeastern United States can use the identified allometric equations, in combination with easily obtained and non-destructive plant volume measurements, to better quantify and monitor ecological change within the dynamic, climate sensitive, and highly-productive mangrove-marsh ecotone.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Hong Kong 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Unknown 93 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 24%
Student > Master 18 19%
Researcher 15 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 4%
Other 14 14%
Unknown 12 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 48 49%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 23%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 2%
Engineering 2 2%
Other 3 3%
Unknown 15 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 August 2015.
All research outputs
#9,650,709
of 16,400,568 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#84,972
of 160,149 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,890
of 190,426 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#1,579
of 2,843 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,400,568 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 160,149 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.2. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 190,426 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,843 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.