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Growth charts for individuals with RubinsteinTaybi syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A, July 2014
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1 tweeter

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14 Mendeley
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Title
Growth charts for individuals with RubinsteinTaybi syndrome
Published in
American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A, July 2014
DOI 10.1002/ajmg.a.36654
Pubmed ID
Authors

Beets, Lex, Rodríguez‐Fonseca, Cristina, Hennekam, Raoul C.

Abstract

Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by variable degrees of intellectual disability, an unusual face, distal limb anomalies including broad thumbs and broad halluces, a large group of variable other major and minor anomalies, and decreased somatic growth. The aim of the present study was to construct up-to-date growth charts specific for infants and children with RSTS. We collected retrospective growth data of 92 RSTS individuals of different ancestries. Data were corrected for secular trends and population of origin to the Dutch growth charts of 2009. On average, 17.9 measurements were available per individual. Height, weight and body mass index (BMI) references for males and females were constructed using the lambda, mu, sigma method. RSTS individuals had normal birth weight and length. Mean final heights were 162.6 cm [-2.99 standard deviation score (SDS)] for males and 151.0 cm [-3.01 SDS] for females. BMI SDS compared to the general Dutch population were -0.06 and 1.40 SDS for males and females, respectively. Head circumference SDS compared to the general Dutch population was -1.89 SDS for males and -2.71 SDS for females. This is the first study to publish growth charts using only molecularly proven RSTS individuals. These syndrome-specific growth charts can be used in managing problems related to growth in RSTS individuals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 43%
Unspecified 1 7%
Student > Master 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Student > Postgraduate 1 7%
Other 4 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 50%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 14%
Unspecified 1 7%
Physics and Astronomy 1 7%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 July 2014.
All research outputs
#2,943,179
of 6,258,277 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A
#759
of 1,402 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,777
of 137,955 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A
#12
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,258,277 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,402 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 137,955 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.