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Unwanted effects: Is there a negative side of meditation? A multicentre survey

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, September 2017
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
92 X users
facebook
4 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
114 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
362 Mendeley
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Title
Unwanted effects: Is there a negative side of meditation? A multicentre survey
Published in
PLOS ONE, September 2017
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0183137
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ausiàs Cebolla, Marcelo Demarzo, Patricia Martins, Joaquim Soler, Javier Garcia-Campayo

Abstract

Despite the long-term use and evidence-based efficacy of meditation and mindfulness-based interventions, there is still a lack of data about the possible unwanted effects (UEs) of these practices. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of UEs among meditation practitioners, considering moderating factors such as the type, frequency, and lifetime duration of the meditation practices. An online survey was developed and disseminated through several websites, such as Spanish-, English- and Portuguese-language scientific research portals related to mindfulness and meditation. After excluding people who did not answer the survey correctly or completely and those who had less than two months of meditation experience, a total of 342 people participated in the study. However, only 87 reported information about UEs. The majority of the practitioners were women from Spain who were married and had a University education level. Practices were more frequently informal, performed on a daily basis, and followed by focused attention (FA). Among the participants, 25.4% reported UEs, showing that severity varies considerably. The information requested indicated that most of the UEs were transitory and did not lead to discontinuing meditation practice or the need for medical assistance. They were more frequently reported in relation to individual practice, during focused attention meditation, and when practising for more than 20 minutes and alone. The practice of body awareness was associated with UEs to a lesser extent, whereas focused attention was associated more with UEs. This is the first large-scale, multi-cultural study on the UEs of meditation. Despite its limitations, this study suggests that UEs are prevalent and transitory and should be further studied. We recommend the use of standardized questionnaires to assess the UEs of meditation practices.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 92 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 362 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 362 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 55 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 44 12%
Student > Master 44 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 26 7%
Researcher 25 7%
Other 67 19%
Unknown 101 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 120 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 28 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 23 6%
Neuroscience 19 5%
Social Sciences 17 5%
Other 41 11%
Unknown 114 31%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 189. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 December 2023.
All research outputs
#210,170
of 25,373,627 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#3,094
of 220,850 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,430
of 323,303 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#71
of 3,953 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,373,627 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 220,850 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 323,303 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,953 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.