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Influence of Body Condition on Influenza A Virus Infection in Mallard Ducks: Experimental Infection Data

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, August 2011
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Title
Influence of Body Condition on Influenza A Virus Infection in Mallard Ducks: Experimental Infection Data
Published in
PLoS ONE, August 2011
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0022633
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dustin M. Arsnoe, Hon S. Ip, Jennifer C. Owen

Abstract

Migrating waterfowl are implicated in the global spread of influenza A viruses (IAVs), and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) are considered a particularly important IAV reservoir. Prevalence of IAV infection in waterfowl peaks during autumn pre-migration staging and then declines as birds reach wintering areas. Migration is energetically costly and birds often experience declines in body condition that may suppress immune function. We assessed how body condition affects susceptibility to infection, viral shedding and antibody production in wild-caught and captive-bred juvenile mallards challenged with low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) H5N9. Wild mallards (n = 30) were separated into three experimental groups; each manipulated through food availability to a different condition level (-20%, -10%, and normal ±5% original body condition), and captive-bred mallards (n = 10) were maintained at normal condition. We found that wild mallards in normal condition were more susceptible to LPAIV infection, shed higher peak viral loads and shed viral RNA more frequently compared to birds in poor condition. Antibody production did not differ according to condition. We found that wild mallards did not differ from captive-bred mallards in viral intensity and duration of infection, but they did exhibit lower antibody titers and greater variation in viral load. Our findings suggest that reduced body condition negatively influences waterfowl host competence to LPAIV infection. This observation is contradictory to the recently proposed condition-dependent hypothesis, according to which birds in reduced condition would be more susceptible to IAV infection. The mechanisms responsible for reducing host competency among birds in poor condition remain unknown. Our research indicates body condition may influence the maintenance and spread of LPAIV by migrating waterfowl.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 6%
Denmark 1 1%
Bolivia, Plurinational State of 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Réunion 1 1%
Unknown 69 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 19%
Student > Master 10 13%
Professor 7 9%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Other 16 21%
Unknown 7 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 41 53%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 9 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 9%
Environmental Science 4 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 4%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 9 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 August 2011.
All research outputs
#9,664,407
of 12,083,996 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#98,978
of 132,928 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,701
of 94,040 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#1,529
of 1,938 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,083,996 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 1,938 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.