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Comorbidity Among Multiple Pain Symptoms and Anxious Depression in a Dutch Population Sample

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pain, July 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
13 tweeters

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Comorbidity Among Multiple Pain Symptoms and Anxious Depression in a Dutch Population Sample
Published in
Journal of Pain, July 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.jpain.2014.06.007
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ligthart L, Visscher CM, van Houtem CM, Geels LM, Vink JM, de Jongh A, Boomsma DI

Abstract

Most studies on pain focus on specific disorders, which makes it hard to compare characteristics across different types of pain symptoms. In this large population-based study, we examine the prevalence and comorbidity patterns among pain symptoms across a wide range of anatomical sites (back, neck, head, abdomen, joints, chest, face, teeth and other), in relation to anxious depression and a range of demographic, health and lifestyle variables. Self-report data were collected in 11,787 adult participants of the Netherlands Twin Registry (mean age 44.5 years, 62% female), including twins and relatives of twins. Headache and abdominal pain were strongly associated with female sex, while chest pain and toothache were not. Joint pain strongly increased with age, whereas headache and abdominal pain decreased with age. Most other pain sites were only weakly associated with age. A highly consistent pattern of comorbidity was observed: all pain symptoms were correlated with all other pain symptoms, as well as with anxious depression. Frequent and widespread pain (i.e., pain at multiple sites) was most strongly associated with anxious depression. These observations reflect important differences between specific pain symptoms, suggesting partly separate etiologies, but also highlight the importance of shared mechanisms underlying pain symptoms in general.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 3%
United Kingdom 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Unknown 28 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 26%
Researcher 7 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 16%
Other 2 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 7 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 39%
Psychology 6 19%
Unspecified 3 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Other 5 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 August 2015.
All research outputs
#757,283
of 5,568,314 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pain
#226
of 913 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,445
of 134,669 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pain
#10
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,568,314 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 913 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 134,669 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.