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A pilot evaluation of a computer-based psychometric test battery designed to detect impairment in patients with cirrhosis

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of General Medicine, September 2017
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Title
A pilot evaluation of a computer-based psychometric test battery designed to detect impairment in patients with cirrhosis
Published in
International Journal of General Medicine, September 2017
DOI 10.2147/ijgm.s140197
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicola A Cook, Jin Un Kim, Yasmin Pasha, Mary ME Crossey, Adrian J Schembri, Brian T Harel, Torben Kimhofer, Simon D Taylor-Robinson

Abstract

Psychometric testing is used to identify patients with cirrhosis who have developed hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Most batteries consist of a series of paper-and-pencil tests, which are cumbersome for most clinicians. A modern, easy-to-use, computer-based battery would be a helpful clinical tool, given that in its minimal form, HE has an impact on both patients' quality of life and the ability to drive and operate machinery (with societal consequences). We compared the Cogstate™ computer battery testing with the Psychometric Hepatic Encephalopathy Score (PHES) tests, with a view to simplify the diagnosis. This was a prospective study of 27 patients with histologically proven cirrhosis. An analysis of psychometric testing was performed using accuracy of task performance and speed of completion as primary variables to create a correlation matrix. A stepwise linear regression analysis was performed with backward elimination, using analysis of variance. Strong correlations were found between the international shopping list, international shopping list delayed recall of Cogstate and the PHES digit symbol test. The Shopping List Tasks were the only tasks that consistently had P values of <0.05 in the linear regression analysis. Subtests of the Cogstate battery correlated very strongly with the digit symbol component of PHES in discriminating severity of HE. These findings would indicate that components of the current PHES battery with the international shopping list tasks of Cogstate would be discriminant and have the potential to be used easily in clinical practice.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 27%
Unspecified 3 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 18%
Researcher 2 18%
Other 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 3 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 27%
Psychology 2 18%
Neuroscience 2 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 9%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 September 2017.
All research outputs
#7,303,823
of 11,727,438 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of General Medicine
#201
of 397 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,430
of 263,887 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of General Medicine
#10
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,727,438 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 397 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,887 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.