↓ Skip to main content

GREEN TREE FROG ( HYLA CINEREA ) AND GROUND SQUIRREL ( XEROSPERMOPHILUS SPILOSOMA ) MORTALITY ATTRIBUTED TO INLAND…

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Wildlife Diseases, January 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Readers on

mendeley
10 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
GREEN TREE FROG ( HYLA CINEREA ) AND GROUND SQUIRREL ( XEROSPERMOPHILUS SPILOSOMA ) MORTALITY ATTRIBUTED TO INLAND BREVETOXIN TRANSPORT AT PADRE ISLAND NATIONAL SEASHORE, TEXAS, USA, 2015
Published in
Journal of Wildlife Diseases, January 2018
DOI 10.7589/2017-01-018
Pubmed ID
Authors

Danielle E. Buttke, Alicia Walker, I-Shuo Huang, Leanne Flewelling, Julia Lankton, Anne E. Ballmann, Travis Clapp, James Lindsay, Paul V. Zimba

Abstract

On 16 September 2015, a red tide (Karenia brevis) bloom impacted coastal areas of Padre Island National Seashore Park. Two days later and about 0.9 km inland, 30-40 adult green tree frogs (Hyla cinerea) were found dead after displaying tremors, weakness, labored breathing, and other signs of neurologic impairment. A rainstorm, accompanied by high winds, rough surf, and high tides, which could have aerosolized brevetoxin, occurred on the morning of the mortality event. Frog carcasses were healthy but contained significant brevetoxin in tissues. Tissue brevetoxin was also found in two dead or dying spotted ground squirrels (Xerospermophilus spilosoma) and a coyote (Canis latrans). Rainwater collected from the location of the mortality event contained brevetoxin. Mortality of green tree frog and ground squirrel mortality has not been previously attributed to brevetoxin exposure and such mortality suggested that inland toxin transport, possibly through aerosols, rainfall, or insects, may have important implications for coastal species.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 3 30%
Professor 1 10%
Student > Master 1 10%
Student > Bachelor 1 10%
Student > Postgraduate 1 10%
Other 3 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 20%
Environmental Science 2 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 20%
Unspecified 2 20%
Computer Science 1 10%
Other 1 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 August 2017.
All research outputs
#1,958,400
of 12,571,426 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Wildlife Diseases
#64
of 534 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,494
of 264,884 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Wildlife Diseases
#2
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,571,426 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 534 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,884 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.