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Declines in insectivorous birds are associated with high neonicotinoid concentrations

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, July 2014
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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447 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
992 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
Title
Declines in insectivorous birds are associated with high neonicotinoid concentrations
Published in
Nature, July 2014
DOI 10.1038/nature13531
Pubmed ID
Authors

Caspar A. Hallmann, Ruud P. B. Foppen, Chris A. M. van Turnhout, Hans de Kroon, Eelke Jongejans

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that neonicotinoid insecticides have adverse effects on non-target invertebrate species. Invertebrates constitute a substantial part of the diet of many bird species during the breeding season and are indispensable for raising offspring. We investigated the hypothesis that the most widely used neonicotinoid insecticide, imidacloprid, has a negative impact on insectivorous bird populations. Here we show that, in the Netherlands, local population trends were significantly more negative in areas with higher surface-water concentrations of imidacloprid. At imidacloprid concentrations of more than 20 nanograms per litre, bird populations tended to decline by 3.5 per cent on average annually. Additional analyses revealed that this spatial pattern of decline appeared only after the introduction of imidacloprid to the Netherlands, in the mid-1990s. We further show that the recent negative relationship remains after correcting for spatial differences in land-use changes that are known to affect bird populations in farmland. Our results suggest that the impact of neonicotinoids on the natural environment is even more substantial than has recently been reported and is reminiscent of the effects of persistent insecticides in the past. Future legislation should take into account the potential cascading effects of neonicotinoids on ecosystems.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 599 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 992 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 12 1%
Switzerland 7 <1%
United Kingdom 6 <1%
Canada 6 <1%
Netherlands 4 <1%
France 3 <1%
Spain 3 <1%
Germany 3 <1%
India 2 <1%
Other 11 1%
Unknown 935 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 187 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 178 18%
Student > Master 175 18%
Student > Bachelor 149 15%
Other 58 6%
Other 138 14%
Unknown 107 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 459 46%
Environmental Science 214 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 37 4%
Engineering 20 2%
Chemistry 19 2%
Other 75 8%
Unknown 168 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 982. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 June 2021.
All research outputs
#8,762
of 18,017,546 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#1,130
of 80,877 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62
of 196,482 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#7
of 868 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,017,546 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 80,877 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 91.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 196,482 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 868 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.