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More fishers and fewer martens due to cumulative effects of forest management and climate change as evidenced from local knowledge

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#33 of 684)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

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23 tweeters
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1 Facebook page
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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91 Mendeley
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Title
More fishers and fewer martens due to cumulative effects of forest management and climate change as evidenced from local knowledge
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13002-017-0180-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pauline Suffice, Hugo Asselin, Louis Imbeau, Marianne Cheveau, Pierre Drapeau

Abstract

Monitoring of fur-bearing species populations is relatively rare due to their low densities. In addition to catch data, trappers' experience provides information on the ecology and status of the harvested species. Fisher (Pekania pennanti) and American marten (Martes americana) are mustelids that are sensitive to forest management and therefore considered to be ecological indicators of forest health. Fisher populations have increased in eastern North America since the early 2000s and this could have resulted in a northeastern extension of the species' range and increased overlap with marten's range. Moreover, habitats of both species are subject to natural and anthropogenic disturbances. The objective of this study was to document the knowledge held by local trappers in the northern area of sympatry between fisher and marten to identify factors that could explain variation in populations of the two species and interactions between them. Forty-one semi-directed interviews with Indigenous and non-Indigenous trappers in the Abitibi-Témiscamingue region of western Quebec (Canada), at the northern limit of the overlapping ranges of the two mustelid species. Trappers highlighted the lack of exclusivity of marten and fisher to coniferous forests, although marten is more closely associated with them than is fisher. Fisher apparently also takes advantage of open environments, including agroforestry systems. Moreover, climate change increases the frequency of freeze-thaw events that cause the formation of an ice crust on the snow surface, which favors fisher movements. The fisher was identified as a competitor and even a predator of the marten. Furthermore, the fisher is less affected than the marten by forest management, and it also seems to benefit from climate change to a greater extent.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 23 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 91 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 16%
Researcher 13 14%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Librarian 4 4%
Other 8 9%
Unknown 16 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 26 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 23%
Social Sciences 7 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 4%
Engineering 2 2%
Other 10 11%
Unknown 21 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 March 2018.
All research outputs
#1,511,307
of 17,953,032 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#33
of 684 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,954
of 281,481 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,953,032 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 684 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,481 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them