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Southern Ocean frontal structure and sea-ice formation rates revealed by elephant seals

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
123 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
272 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
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Title
Southern Ocean frontal structure and sea-ice formation rates revealed by elephant seals
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 2008
DOI 10.1073/pnas.0800790105
Pubmed ID
Authors

J.-B. Charrassin, M. Hindell, S. R. Rintoul, F. Roquet, S. Sokolov, M. Biuw, D. Costa, L. Boehme, P. Lovell, R. Coleman, R. Timmermann, A. Meijers, M. Meredith, Y.-H. Park, F. Bailleul, M. Goebel, Y. Tremblay, C.-A. Bost, C. R. McMahon, I. C. Field, M. A. Fedak, C. Guinet

Abstract

Polar regions are particularly sensitive to climate change, with the potential for significant feedbacks between ocean circulation, sea ice, and the ocean carbon cycle. However, the difficulty in obtaining in situ data means that our ability to detect and interpret change is very limited, especially in the Southern Ocean, where the ocean beneath the sea ice remains almost entirely unobserved and the rate of sea-ice formation is poorly known. Here, we show that southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) equipped with oceanographic sensors can measure ocean structure and water mass changes in regions and seasons rarely observed with traditional oceanographic platforms. In particular, seals provided a 30-fold increase in hydrographic profiles from the sea-ice zone, allowing the major fronts to be mapped south of 60 degrees S and sea-ice formation rates to be inferred from changes in upper ocean salinity. Sea-ice production rates peaked in early winter (April-May) during the rapid northward expansion of the pack ice and declined by a factor of 2 to 3 between May and August, in agreement with a three-dimensional coupled ocean-sea-ice model. By measuring the high-latitude ocean during winter, elephant seals fill a "blind spot" in our sampling coverage, enabling the establishment of a truly global ocean-observing system.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 272 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 4 1%
United States 3 1%
France 3 1%
Brazil 3 1%
South Africa 2 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 251 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 90 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 50 18%
Student > Master 30 11%
Student > Bachelor 26 10%
Other 15 6%
Other 46 17%
Unknown 15 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 117 43%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 79 29%
Environmental Science 37 14%
Engineering 7 3%
Chemistry 4 1%
Other 6 2%
Unknown 22 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2016.
All research outputs
#3,092,064
of 17,353,889 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#34,776
of 89,287 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,449
of 195,164 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#507
of 944 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,353,889 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 89,287 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 195,164 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 944 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.