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Treating symptomatic uterine fibroids with myomectomy: current practice and views of UK consultants

Overview of attention for article published in Gynecological Surgery, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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9 Mendeley
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Title
Treating symptomatic uterine fibroids with myomectomy: current practice and views of UK consultants
Published in
Gynecological Surgery, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s10397-017-1014-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

R. Fusun Sirkeci, Anna Maria Belli, Isaac T. Manyonda

Abstract

The demand for uterus-sparing treatments is increasing as more women postpone childbirth to their 30-40s, when fibroids are more symptomatic. With an increasing choice of treatment options and changing care-provider profiles, now is an opportune time to survey current practices and opinions. Using a 25-stem questionnaire, a web-based survey was used to capture the practices and opinions of UK consultant gynecologists on the treatment of symptomatic fibroids, including the types of procedure most frequently used, methods used to reduce blood loss, and awareness and acceptability of treatment options, and to assess the impact of gender and experience of the treating gynecologist. The response rate was 22%. Laparascopic myomectomy is used least frequently, with 80% of the respondents using GnRHa preoperatively to minimize blood loss and correct anemia, while vasopressin is most frequently used to reduce intraoperative blood loss. Female consultants operate significantly less frequently than males. Those with more than 10 years consultant experience are more likely to perform an open myomectomy compared to those with less than 10 years experience. Compared to a similar survey performed 10 years ago, surgical methods remain to be the most common treatments, but use of less invasive treatments such as UAE has increased. Consultants' attitudes appear to be responding to the patient demand for less radical treatments. However, it is yet to be seen if the changing consultant demographics will keep up with this demand. The low response rate warrants cautious interpretation of the results, but they provide an interesting snapshot of current views and practices.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 2 22%
Other 1 11%
Student > Bachelor 1 11%
Professor 1 11%
Student > Postgraduate 1 11%
Other 3 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 56%
Unspecified 2 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 January 2019.
All research outputs
#6,922,547
of 13,210,683 outputs
Outputs from Gynecological Surgery
#40
of 90 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#108,770
of 267,369 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Gynecological Surgery
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,210,683 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 90 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,369 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them