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Differentially expressed genes during the imbibition of dormant and after-ripened seeds – a reverse genetics approach

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Plant Biology, September 2017
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Title
Differentially expressed genes during the imbibition of dormant and after-ripened seeds – a reverse genetics approach
Published in
BMC Plant Biology, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12870-017-1098-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Farzaneh Yazdanpanah, Johannes Hanson, Henk W.M. Hilhorst, Leónie Bentsink

Abstract

Seed dormancy, defined as the incapability of a viable seed to germinate under favourable conditions, is an important trait in nature and agriculture. Despite extensive research on dormancy and germination, many questions about the molecular mechanisms controlling these traits remain unanswered, likely due to its genetic complexity and the large environmental effects which are characteristic of these quantitative traits. To boost research towards revealing mechanisms in the control of seed dormancy and germination we depend on the identification of genes controlling those traits. We used transcriptome analysis combined with a reverse genetics approach to identify genes that are prominent for dormancy maintenance and germination in imbibed seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana. Comparative transcriptomics analysis was employed on freshly harvested (dormant) and after-ripened (AR; non-dormant) 24-h imbibed seeds of four different DELAY OF GERMINATION near isogenic lines (DOGNILs) and the Landsberg erecta (Ler) wild type with varying levels of primary dormancy. T-DNA knock-out lines of the identified genes were phenotypically investigated for their effect on dormancy and AR. We identified conserved sets of 46 and 25 genes which displayed higher expression in seeds of all dormant and all after-ripened DOGNILs and Ler, respectively. Knock-out mutants in these genes showed dormancy and germination related phenotypes. Most of the identified genes had not been implicated in seed dormancy or germination. This research will be useful to further decipher the molecular mechanisms by which these important ecological and commercial traits are regulated.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 20%
Researcher 7 17%
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 11 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 44%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 24%
Design 1 2%
Unknown 12 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2017.
All research outputs
#9,434,850
of 11,805,455 outputs
Outputs from BMC Plant Biology
#928
of 1,422 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#194,506
of 265,679 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Plant Biology
#6
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,805,455 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,422 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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