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The molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 in the Comunidad Valenciana (Spain): analysis of transmission clusters

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, September 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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12 Mendeley
Title
The molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 in the Comunidad Valenciana (Spain): analysis of transmission clusters
Published in
Scientific Reports, September 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-10286-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Juan Ángel Patiño-Galindo, Manoli Torres-Puente, María Alma Bracho, Ignacio Alastrué, Amparo Juan, David Navarro, María José Galindo, Dolores Ocete, Enrique Ortega, Concepción Gimeno, Josefina Belda, Victoria Domínguez, Rosario Moreno, Fernando González-Candelas

Abstract

HIV infections are still a very serious concern for public heath worldwide. We have applied molecular evolution methods to study the HIV-1 epidemics in the Comunidad Valenciana (CV, Spain) from a public health surveillance perspective. For this, we analysed 1804 HIV-1 sequences comprising protease and reverse transcriptase (PR/RT) coding regions, sampled between 2004 and 2014. These sequences were subtyped and subjected to phylogenetic analyses in order to detect transmission clusters. In addition, univariate and multinomial comparisons were performed to detect epidemiological differences between HIV-1 subtypes, and risk groups. The HIV epidemic in the CV is dominated by subtype B infections among local men who have sex with men (MSM). 270 transmission clusters were identified (>57% of the dataset), 12 of which included ≥10 patients; 11 of subtype B (9 affecting MSMs) and one (n = 21) of CRF14, affecting predominately intravenous drug users (IDUs). Dated phylogenies revealed these large clusters to have originated from the mid-80s to the early 00 s. Subtype B is more likely to form transmission clusters than non-B variants and MSMs to cluster than other risk groups. Multinomial analyses revealed an association between non-B variants, which are not established in the local population yet, and different foreign groups.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 33%
Student > Master 3 25%
Librarian 2 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 17%
Professor 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 17%
Unspecified 2 17%
Chemistry 1 8%
Other 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 September 2017.
All research outputs
#1,966,296
of 11,788,552 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#13,817
of 51,913 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#64,378
of 265,565 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#1,105
of 4,030 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,788,552 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 51,913 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,565 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,030 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.