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Retrieving ascarid and taeniid eggs from the biological remains of a Neolithic dog from the late 9th millennium BC in Western Iran

Overview of attention for article published in Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, September 2017
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Title
Retrieving ascarid and taeniid eggs from the biological remains of a Neolithic dog from the late 9th millennium BC in Western Iran
Published in
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, September 2017
DOI 10.1590/0074-02760160420
Pubmed ID
Authors

Niloofar Paknezhad, Farbod Haji Mazdarani, Morteza Hessari, Iraj Mobedi, Faezeh Najafi, Negar Bizhani, Mahsasadat Makki, Gholamreza Hassanpour, Gholamreza Mowlavi

Abstract

Paleoparasitology reveals the status of parasitic infections in humans and animals in ancient times based on parasitic particles found in biological remains from archaeological excavations. This line of research emerged in Iran in 2013. The identification of parasites from Neolithic times is an attractive subject that shows the oldest origins of parasitic infections in a given geographical region. From an archaeological point of view, this archaeological site is well-known for animal domestication and agriculture in ancient Iran. In this study, soil deposited on the surface and in the pores of a dog pelvic bone was carefully collected and rehydrated using trisodium phosphate solution. The results showed ascarid and taeniid eggs retrieved from the biological remains of a dog excavated at the East Chia Sabz archaeological site, which dates back to the Neolithic period (8100 BC). The current findings clearly illustrate the natural circulation of nematode and cestode parasites among dogs at that time. These ancient helminth eggs can also be used to track the oldest parasitic infections in the Iranian plateau and contribute to the paleoparasitological documentation of the Fertile Crescent.

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The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor > Associate Professor 3 21%
Researcher 3 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 14%
Professor 2 14%
Other 1 7%
Other 2 14%
Unknown 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 29%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 14%
Arts and Humanities 2 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 2 14%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 November 2017.
All research outputs
#15,745,807
of 25,382,440 outputs
Outputs from Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
#936
of 1,502 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#177,806
of 324,453 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
#8
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,382,440 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,502 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 324,453 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.