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Nutrient Loadings to Streams of the Continental United States from Municipal and Industrial Effluent1

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the American Water Resources Association, August 2011
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Title
Nutrient Loadings to Streams of the Continental United States from Municipal and Industrial Effluent1
Published in
Journal of the American Water Resources Association, August 2011
DOI 10.1111/j.1752-1688.2011.00576.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Molly A. Maupin, Tamara Ivahnenko

Abstract

Data from the United States Environmental Protection Agency Permit Compliance System national database were used to calculate annual total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) loads to surface waters from municipal and industrial facilities in six major regions of the United States for 1992, 1997, and 2002. Concentration and effluent flow data were examined for approximately 118,250 facilities in 45 states and the District of Columbia. Inconsistent and incomplete discharge locations, effluent flows, and effluent nutrient concentrations limited the use of these data for calculating nutrient loads. More concentrations were reported for major facilities, those discharging more than 1 million gallons per day, than for minor facilities, and more concentrations were reported for TP than for TN. Analytical methods to check and improve the quality of the Permit Compliance System data were used. Annual loads were calculated using "typical pollutant concentrations" to supplement missing concentrations based on the type and size of facilities. Annual nutrient loads for over 26,600 facilities were calculated for at least one of the three years. Sewage systems represented 74% of all TN loads and 58% of all TP loads. This work represents an initial set of data to develop a comprehensive and consistent national database of point-source nutrient loads. These loads can be used to inform a wide range of water-quality management, watershed modeling, and research efforts at multiple scales.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 6%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 2%
China 1 2%
Ireland 1 2%
Unknown 41 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 17%
Student > Master 5 11%
Other 5 11%
Professor 3 6%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 4 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 22 47%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 11 23%
Engineering 4 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 5 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2011.
All research outputs
#10,438,019
of 13,089,117 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the American Water Resources Association
#597
of 715 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,842
of 91,760 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the American Water Resources Association
#6
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,089,117 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 715 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 91,760 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.