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Community based interventions for the prevention and control of Non-Helmintic NTD

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty, July 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
90 Mendeley
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Title
Community based interventions for the prevention and control of Non-Helmintic NTD
Published in
Infectious Diseases of Poverty, July 2014
DOI 10.1186/2049-9957-3-24
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jai K Das, Rehana A Salam, Ahmed Arshad, Hasina Maredia, Zulfiqar A Bhutta

Abstract

In this paper, we aim to systematically analyze the effectiveness of community based interventions (CBI) for the prevention and control of non-helminthic diseases including dengue, trypanosomiasis, chagas, leishmaniasis, buruli ulcer, leprosy and trachoma. We systematically reviewed literature published up to May 2013 and included 62 studies in this review. Findings from our review suggest that CBI including insecticide spraying; insecticide treated bednets and curtains; community education and cleanliness campaigns; chemoprophylaxis through mass drug administration; and treatment have the potential to reduce the incidence and burden of non-helminthic diseases. Lack of data limited the subgroup analysis for integrated and non-integrated delivery strategies however, qualitative synthesis suggest that integrated delivery is more effective when compared to vertical interventions; however, such integration was possible only because of the existing vertical vector control programs. Community delivered interventions have the potential to achieve wider coverage and sustained community acceptance. Eradicating these diseases will require a multipronged approach including drug administration, health education, vector control and clean water and sanitation facilities. This would require high level governmental commitment along with strong partnerships among major stakeholders.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
United States 1 1%
Bangladesh 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 85 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 22 24%
Student > Master 19 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 11%
Other 10 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 7%
Other 13 14%
Unknown 10 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 32 36%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 12%
Social Sciences 7 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 4%
Other 10 11%
Unknown 15 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 May 2017.
All research outputs
#1,401,415
of 11,130,136 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#51
of 379 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,246
of 187,314 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#2
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,130,136 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 379 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 187,314 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.