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Differential signal sensitivities can contribute to the stability of multispecies bacterial communities

Overview of attention for article published in Biology Direct, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
19 Mendeley
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Title
Differential signal sensitivities can contribute to the stability of multispecies bacterial communities
Published in
Biology Direct, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13062-017-0192-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

János Juhász, Dóra Bihary, Attila Jády, Sándor Pongor, Balázs Ligeti

Abstract

Bacterial species present in multispecies microbial communities often react to the same chemical signal but at vastly different concentrations. The existence of different response thresholds with respect to the same signal molecule has been well documented in quorum sensing which is one of the best studied inter-cellular signalling mechanisms in bacteria. The biological significance of this phenomenon is still poorly understood, and cannot be easily studied in nature or in laboratory models. The aim of this study is to establish the role of differential signal response thresholds in stabilizing microbial communities. We tested binary competition scenarios using an agent-based model in which competing bacteria had different response levels with respect to signals, cooperation factors or both, respectively. While in previous scenarios fitter species outcompete slower growing competitors, we found that stable equilibria could form if the fitter species responded to a higher chemical concentration level than the slower growing competitor. We also found that species secreting antibiotic could form a stable community with other competing species if antibiotic production started at higher response thresholds. Microbial communities in nature rely on the stable coexistence of species that necessarily differ in their fitness. We found that differential response thresholds provide a simple and elegant way for keeping slower growing species within the community. High response thresholds can be considered as self-restraint of the fitter species that allows metabolically useful but slower growing species to remain within a community, and thereby the metabolic repertoire of the community will be maintained. This article was reviewed by Michael Gromiha, Sebastian Maurer-Stroh, István Simon and L. Aravind.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 21%
Other 3 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Lecturer 1 5%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 4 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 37%
Chemistry 2 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 5 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 September 2017.
All research outputs
#1,590,384
of 11,799,674 outputs
Outputs from Biology Direct
#109
of 548 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,014
of 266,443 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology Direct
#2
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,799,674 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 548 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,443 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.