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Metamorphosis Enhances the Effects of Metal Exposure on the Mayfly, Centroptilum triangulifer

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, August 2014
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Title
Metamorphosis Enhances the Effects of Metal Exposure on the Mayfly, Centroptilum triangulifer
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, August 2014
DOI 10.1021/es501914y
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. S. Wesner, J. M. Kraus, T. S. Schmidt, D. M. Walters, W. H. Clements

Abstract

The response of larval aquatic insects to stressors such as metals is used to assess the ecological condition of streams worldwide. However, nearly all larval insects metamorphose from aquatic larvae to winged adults, and recent surveys indicate that adults may be a more sensitive indicator of stream metal toxicity than larvae. One hypothesis to explain this pattern is that insects exposed to elevated metal in their larval stages have a reduced ability to successfully complete metamorphosis. To test this hypothesis we exposed late-instar larvae of the mayfly, Centroptilum triangulifer, to an aqueous Zn gradient (32-476 μg/L) in the laboratory. After six days of exposure, when metamorphosis began, larval survival was unaffected by zinc. However, Zn reduced wingpad development at concentrations above 139 μg/L. In contrast, emergence of subimagos and imagos tended to decline with any increase in Zn. At Zn concentrations below 105 μg/L (hardness-adjusted aquatic life criterion), survival between the wingpad and subimago stages declined 5-fold across the Zn gradient. These results support the hypothesis that metamorphosis may be a survival bottleneck, particularly in contaminated streams. Thus, death during metamorphosis may be a key mechanism explaining how stream metal contamination can impact terrestrial communities by reducing aquatic insect emergence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 5%
Belgium 1 3%
Unknown 37 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 25%
Student > Master 9 23%
Student > Bachelor 6 15%
Other 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 1 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 18 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 33%
Chemistry 2 5%
Unknown 7 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 August 2014.
All research outputs
#9,086,952
of 11,351,025 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#10,446
of 11,625 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,443
of 189,067 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#207
of 259 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,351,025 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,625 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,067 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 259 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.