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The Transcriptome of Nacobbus aberrans Reveals Insights into the Evolution of Sedentary Endoparasitism in Plant-Parasitic Nematodes

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology & Evolution, August 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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14 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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32 Dimensions

Readers on

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67 Mendeley
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Title
The Transcriptome of Nacobbus aberrans Reveals Insights into the Evolution of Sedentary Endoparasitism in Plant-Parasitic Nematodes
Published in
Genome Biology & Evolution, August 2014
DOI 10.1093/gbe/evu171
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sebastian Eves-van den Akker, Catherine J. Lilley, Etienne G. J. Danchin, Corinne Rancurel, Peter J. A. Cock, Peter E. Urwin, John T. Jones

Abstract

Within the phylum Nematoda, plant-parasitism is hypothesised to have arisen independently on at least four occasions. The most economically damaging plant-parasitic nematode species, and consequently the most widely studied, are those that feed as they migrate destructively through host roots causing necrotic lesions (migratory endoparasites) and those that modify host root tissue to create a nutrient sink from which they feed (sedentary endoparasites). The false root-knot nematode Nacobbus aberrans is the only known species to have both migratory endoparasitic and sedentary endoparasitic stages within its life cycle. Moreover, its sedentary stage appears to have characteristics of both the root-knot and the cyst nematodes. We present the first large scale genetic resource of any false-root knot nematode species. We use RNAseq to describe relative abundance changes in all expressed genes across the life cycle to provide interesting insights into the biology of this nematode as it transitions between modes of parasitism. A multi-gene phylogenetic analysis of N. aberrans with respect to plant-parasitic nematodes of all groups confirms its proximity to both cyst and root-knot nematodes. We present a transcriptome-wide analysis of both lateral gene transfer events and the effector complement. Comparing parasitism genes of typical root-knot and cyst nematodes to those of N. aberrans has revealed interesting similarities. Importantly, genes that were believed to be either cyst nematode, or root-knot nematode, "specific" have both been identified in N. aberrans. Our results provide insights into the characteristics of a common ancestor and the evolution of sedentary endoparasitism of plants by nematodes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 1%
Taiwan 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 64 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 18%
Student > Master 10 15%
Student > Postgraduate 7 10%
Other 5 7%
Other 11 16%
Unknown 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 40 60%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 10%
Environmental Science 3 4%
Engineering 2 3%
Computer Science 2 3%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 10 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 February 2021.
All research outputs
#2,097,826
of 18,593,253 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology & Evolution
#563
of 2,498 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,846
of 209,245 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology & Evolution
#14
of 78 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,593,253 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,498 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 209,245 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 78 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.