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The outcome of prostate cancer patients treated with curative intent strongly depends on survival after metastatic progression

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, September 2017
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2 tweeters

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
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Title
The outcome of prostate cancer patients treated with curative intent strongly depends on survival after metastatic progression
Published in
BMC Cancer, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12885-017-3617-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mariarosa Pascale, Che Ngwa Azinwi, Barbara Marongiu, Gianfranco Pesce, Flavio Stoffel, Enrico Roggero

Abstract

Five-year survival in patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa) is nearly 100%, but metastatic disease still remains incurable. Clinical management of metastatic patients has become increasingly complex as novel therapeutic strategies have emerged. This study aims at evaluating the impact of the first metastatic progression on the outcome of PCa patients treated with curative intent. The analysis was conducted using data of 913 cases of localized PCa diagnosed between 2000 and 2014. All patients were treated with curative surgery (N = 382) or radiotherapy (N = 531) with or without adjuvant therapy. All metastases were radiologically documented. The prognostic impact of the first site of metastasis on metastasis-free survival (MFS) and PCa-specific survival (PCaSS) was investigated by univariate and multivariate analyses. One hundred and thirty-six (14.9%) patients developed a metastatic hormone-sensitive PCa and had a median PCaSS of 50.4 months after first metastatic progression. Bone (N = 50, 36.8%) and LN or locoregional (N = 52, 38.2%) metastases occurred more frequently with a median PCaSS of 39.7 and 137 months respectively (p < 0.0001). Seven patients developed visceral metastasis only (5.1%; liver, lung, brain) and 27 (19.9%) concurrent metastases; this last group was associated with the worst survival with a median value of only 17 months. Thus, each subgroup exhibited a survival after metastasis significantly different from each other. In multivariate analysis the site of the first metastasis was an independent prognostic factor for PCaSS along with Gleason score at diagnosis. The correlation between survival and first site of metastasis was confirmed separately for each therapy subgroup. Median metastasis-free survival from primary diagnosis to first metastasis was not correlated with the first site of metastasis. In non-metastatic PCa patients treated with curative intent, the PCa-specific survival time depends on the time after metastatic progression rather than the time from diagnosis to metastasis. Moreover, the site of first metastasis is an independent prognostic factor for PCaSS. Our data confirm that the first metastatic event may confer a differential prognostic impact and may help in identifying patient at high risk of death supporting the treatment-decision making process following metastatic progression.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 21%
Student > Bachelor 5 15%
Researcher 4 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 12%
Lecturer 3 9%
Other 6 18%
Unknown 4 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 6%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 5 15%
Unknown 7 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 September 2017.
All research outputs
#7,081,930
of 11,841,246 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#1,853
of 4,335 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#140,299
of 267,803 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#23
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,841,246 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,335 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,803 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.