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Mortality due to noncommunicable diseases in Brazil, 1990 to 2015, according to estimates from the Global Burden of Disease study

Overview of attention for article published in Sao Paulo Medical Journal, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 211)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
45 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
75 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Mortality due to noncommunicable diseases in Brazil, 1990 to 2015, according to estimates from the Global Burden of Disease study
Published in
Sao Paulo Medical Journal, January 2017
DOI 10.1590/1516-3180.2016.0330050117
Pubmed ID
Authors

Malta, Deborah Carvalho, França, Elisabeth, Abreu, Daisy Maria Xavier, Perillo, Rosângela Durso, Salmen, Maíra Coube, Teixeira, Renato Azeredo, Passos, Valeria, Souza, Maria de Fátima Marinho, Mooney, Meghan, Naghavi, Mohsen, Deborah Carvalho Malta, Elisabeth França, Daisy Maria Xavier Abreu, Rosângela Durso Perillo, Maíra Coube Salmen, Renato Azeredo Teixeira, Valeria Passos, Maria de Fátima Marinho Souza, Meghan Mooney, Mohsen Naghavi

Abstract

Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading health problem globally and generate high numbers of premature deaths and loss of quality of life. The aim here was to describe the major groups of causes of death due to NCDs and the ranking of the leading causes of premature death between 1990 and 2015, according to the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2015 study estimates for Brazil. Cross-sectional study covering Brazil and its 27 federal states. This was a descriptive study on rates of mortality due to NCDs, with corrections for garbage codes and underreporting of deaths. This study shows the epidemiological transition in Brazil between 1990 and 2015, with increasing proportional mortality due to NCDs, followed by violence, and decreasing mortality due to communicable, maternal and neonatal causes within the global burden of diseases. NCDs had the highest mortality rates over the whole period, but with reductions in cardiovascular diseases, chronic respiratory diseases and cancer. Diabetes increased over this period. NCDs were the leading causes of premature death (30 to 69 years): ischemic heart diseases and cerebrovascular diseases, followed by interpersonal violence, traffic injuries and HIV/AIDS. The decline in mortality due to NCDs confirms that improvements in disease control have been achieved in Brazil. Nonetheless, the high mortality due to violence is a warning sign. Through maintaining the current decline in NCDs, Brazil should meet the target of 25% reduction proposed by the World Health Organization by 2025.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 75 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 19 25%
Student > Master 10 13%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Researcher 5 7%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 19 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 19%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 7%
Computer Science 4 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 22 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 November 2017.
All research outputs
#1,119,764
of 12,196,902 outputs
Outputs from Sao Paulo Medical Journal
#8
of 211 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,526
of 268,218 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sao Paulo Medical Journal
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,196,902 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 211 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,218 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them