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From policy to practice: implementing frontline community health services for substance dependence-study protocol

Overview of attention for article published in Implementation Science, August 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
116 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
From policy to practice: implementing frontline community health services for substance dependence-study protocol
Published in
Implementation Science, August 2014
DOI 10.1186/s13012-014-0108-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kathryn J Gill, Emily Campbell, Gail Gauthier, Spyridoula Xenocostas, Dara Charney, Ann C Macaulay

Abstract

BackgroundSubstance abuse is a worldwide public health concern. Extensive scientific research has shown that screening and brief interventions for substance use disorders administered in primary care provide substantial benefit at relatively low cost. Frontline health clinicians are well placed to detect and treat patients with substance use disorders. Despite effectiveness shown in research, there are many factors that impact the implementation of these practices in real-world clinical practice. Recently, the Ministry of Health and Social Services in Quebec, Canada, issued two policy documents aimed at introducing screening and early intervention for substance abuse into frontline healthcare clinics in Quebec. The current research protocol was developed in order to study the process of implementation of evidence-based addiction treatment practices at three primary care clinics in Montreal (Phase 1). In addition, the research protocol was designed to examine the efficacy of overall policy implementation, including barriers and facilitators to addictions program development throughout Quebec (Phase 2).Methods/DesignPhase 1 will provide an in-depth case study of knowledge translation and implementation. The study protocol will utilize an integrated knowledge translation strategy to build collaborative mechanisms for knowledge exchange between researchers, addiction specialists, and frontline practitioners (guided by the principles of participatory-action research), and directly examine the process of knowledge uptake and barriers to transfer using both qualitative and quantitative methodologies. Evaluation will involve multiple measures, time points and domains; program uptake and effectiveness will be determined by changes in healthcare service delivery, sustainability and outcomes. In Phase 2, qualitative methods will be utilized to examine the contextual facilitators and barriers that frontline organizations face in implementing services for substance dependence. Phase 2 will provide the first study exploring the wide-scale implementation of frontline services for substance dependence in the province of Quebec and yield needed information about how to effectively implement mandated policies into clinical practice and impact public health.DiscussionFindings from this research program will contribute to the understanding of factors associated with implementation of frontline services for substance dependence and help to inform future policy and organizational support for the implementation evidence-based practices.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 116 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 115 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 23 20%
Student > Master 23 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 9%
Student > Bachelor 10 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 7%
Other 23 20%
Unknown 19 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 16%
Psychology 13 11%
Social Sciences 12 10%
Computer Science 4 3%
Other 20 17%
Unknown 24 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 September 2014.
All research outputs
#9,401,520
of 17,792,212 outputs
Outputs from Implementation Science
#1,187
of 1,592 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,788
of 207,812 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Implementation Science
#3
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,792,212 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,592 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.1. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 207,812 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.