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Barriers and facilitators associated with attendance at hospital diabetes clinics among young adults (15-30 years) with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Pediatric Diabetes, August 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

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62 Mendeley
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Title
Barriers and facilitators associated with attendance at hospital diabetes clinics among young adults (15-30 years) with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review
Published in
Pediatric Diabetes, August 2014
DOI 10.1111/pedi.12198
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lisa Hynes, Molly Byrne, Sean F Dinneen, Brian E McGuire, Máire O'Donnell, Jennifer Mc Sharry

Abstract

Regular clinic attendance is recommended to facilitate self-management of diabetes. Poor attendance is common among young adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). This systematic review aimed to produce a narrative synthesis of the evidence regarding factors which promote or impede regular attendance at adult diabetes clinics among young adults (15-30 years) with type 1 DM. Studies reporting facilitators and barriers to clinic attendance were identified by searching four electronic databases, checking reference lists, and contacting diabetes research networks. A total of 12 studies (8 quantitative and 4 qualitative) met the inclusion criteria. Young adult's experiences transitioning from paediatric to adult diabetes care can influence attendance at the adult clinic positively if there is a comprehensive transition programme in place, or negatively if the two clinics do not communicate and provide adequate support. Post-transition, relationship development and perceptions of the value of attending the clinic are important for regular attendance. Controlled research is required to better understand decisions to attend or not attend outpatient services among people with chronic conditions. Service delivery must be sensitive to the developmental characteristics of young adults and tailored support may be required by young adults at greatest risk of non-attendance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Unknown 60 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 21%
Researcher 12 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 16%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Other 14 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 40%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 18%
Psychology 8 13%
Unspecified 6 10%
Social Sciences 5 8%
Other 7 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 May 2015.
All research outputs
#7,342,051
of 13,022,627 outputs
Outputs from Pediatric Diabetes
#264
of 556 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,872
of 199,558 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pediatric Diabetes
#8
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,022,627 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 556 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 199,558 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.