↓ Skip to main content

Micromagnetic resonance relaxometry for rapid label-free malaria diagnosis

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Medicine, August 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
18 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
45 tweeters
weibo
1 weibo user
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
3 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
94 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
133 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Micromagnetic resonance relaxometry for rapid label-free malaria diagnosis
Published in
Nature Medicine, August 2014
DOI 10.1038/nm.3622
Pubmed ID
Authors

Weng Kung Peng, Tian Fook Kong, Chee Sheng Ng, Lan Chen, Yongxue Huang, Ali Asgar S Bhagat, Nam-Trung Nguyen, Peter Rainer Preiser, Jongyoon Han

Abstract

We report a new technique for sensitive, quantitative and rapid detection of Plasmodium spp.-infected red blood cells (RBCs) by means of magnetic resonance relaxometry (MRR). During the intraerythrocytic cycle, malaria parasites metabolize large amounts of cellular hemoglobin and convert it into hemozoin crystallites. We exploit the relatively large paramagnetic susceptibility of these hemozoin particles, which induce substantial changes in the transverse relaxation rate of proton nuclear magnetic resonance of RBCs, to infer the 'parasite load' in blood. Using an inexpensive benchtop 0.5-Tesla MRR system, we show that with minimal sample preparatory steps and without any chemical or immunolabeling, a parasitemia level of fewer than ten parasites per microliter in a volume below 10 μl of whole blood is detected in a few minutes. We demonstrate this method both for cultured Plasmodium falciparum parasites and in vivo with Plasmodium berghei-infected mice.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 45 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 133 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Singapore 1 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 127 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 26%
Researcher 23 17%
Student > Master 20 15%
Student > Bachelor 13 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 5%
Other 20 15%
Unknown 17 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 26 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 9%
Chemistry 10 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 7%
Other 26 20%
Unknown 24 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 202. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 March 2015.
All research outputs
#132,070
of 20,568,640 outputs
Outputs from Nature Medicine
#558
of 8,025 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,271
of 213,657 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Medicine
#5
of 94 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,568,640 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,025 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 87.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 213,657 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 94 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.