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Enhanced recovery protocols for colorectal surgery and postoperative renal function: a retrospective review

Overview of attention for article published in Perioperative Medicine, September 2017
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2 tweeters

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Title
Enhanced recovery protocols for colorectal surgery and postoperative renal function: a retrospective review
Published in
Perioperative Medicine, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13741-017-0069-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Charles R. Horres, Mohamed A. Adam, Zhifei Sun, Julie K. Thacker, Richard E. Moon, Timothy E. Miller, Stuart A. Grant

Abstract

While enhanced recovery protocols (ERPs) reduce physiologic stress and improve outcomes in general, their effects on postoperative renal function have not been directly studied. Patients undergoing major colorectal surgery under ERP (February 2010 to March 2013) were compared with a traditional care control group (October 2004 October 2007) at a single institution. Multivariable regression models examined the association of ERP with postoperative creatinine changes and incidence of postoperative acute kidney dysfunction (based on the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, and End-stage renal disease criteria). Included were 1054 patients: 590 patients underwent surgery with ERP and 464 patients without ERP. Patient demographics were not significantly different. Higher rates of neoplastic and inflammatory bowel disease surgical indications were found in the ERP group (81 vs. 74%, p = 0.045). Patients in the ERP group had more comorbidities (ASA ≥ 3) (62 vs. 40%, p < 0.001). In unadjusted analysis, postoperative creatinine increase was slightly higher in the ERP group compared with control (median 0.1 vs. 0 mg/dL, p < 0.001), but levels of postoperative acute kidney injury were similar in both groups (p = 0.998). After adjustment with multivariable regression, postoperative changes in creatinine were similar in ERP vs. control (p = 0.25). ERP in colorectal surgery is not associated with a clinically significant increase in postoperative creatinine or incidence of postoperative kidney injury. Our results support the safety of ERPs in colorectal surgery and may promote expanding implementation of these protocols. Not applicable, prospective data collection and retrospective chart review only.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 3 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 18%
Student > Bachelor 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Student > Master 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Unknown 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 45%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 9%
Social Sciences 1 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 September 2017.
All research outputs
#9,437,078
of 11,809,688 outputs
Outputs from Perioperative Medicine
#85
of 105 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#196,831
of 268,358 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Perioperative Medicine
#5
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,809,688 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 105 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.