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Basal forebrain dynamics during a tactile discrimination task

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurophysiology, September 2014
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Title
Basal forebrain dynamics during a tactile discrimination task
Published in
Journal of Neurophysiology, September 2014
DOI 10.1152/jn.00040.2014
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eric Thomson, Jason Lou, Kathryn Sylvester, Annie McDonough, Stefani Tica, Miguel A. Nicolelis

Abstract

The nucleus basalis (NB) is a cholinergic neuromodulatory structure that projects liberally to the entire cortical mantle and regulates information processing in all cortical layers. Here, we recorded activity from populations of single units in the NB as rats performed a whisker-dependent tactile discrimination task. Over 80% of neurons responded with significant modulation in at least one phase of the task. Such activity started before stimulus onset and continued for seconds after reward delivery. Firing rates monotonically increased with reward magnitude during the task, suggesting that NB neurons are not indicating the absolute deviation from expected reward amounts. Individual neurons also encoded significant amounts of information about stimulus identity. Such robust coding was not present when the same stimuli were delivered to lightly anesthetized animals, suggesting that the NB neurons contain a sensorimotor, rather than purely sensory or motor, representation of the environment. Overall, these results support the hypothesis that neurons in the NB provide a value-laden representation of the sensorimotor state of the animal as it engages in significant behavioral tasks.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 7%
Sweden 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Peru 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 34 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 41%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 24%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 10%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 4 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 51%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 17%
Neuroscience 7 17%
Psychology 2 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 1 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 September 2014.
All research outputs
#11,121,229
of 12,505,093 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurophysiology
#4,635
of 5,018 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#164,854
of 201,320 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurophysiology
#76
of 85 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 85 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.