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Microbiota-related Changes in Bile Acid

Overview of attention for article published in EBioMedicine, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
134 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
144 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
307 Mendeley
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Title
Microbiota-related Changes in Bile Acid & Tryptophan Metabolism are Associated with Gastrointestinal Dysfunction in a Mouse Model of Autism
Published in
EBioMedicine, October 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.ebiom.2017.09.020
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna V. Golubeva, Susan A. Joyce, Gerard Moloney, Aurelijus Burokas, Eoin Sherwin, Silvia Arboleya, Ian Flynn, Dmitry Khochanskiy, Angela Moya-Pérez, Veronica Peterson, Kieran Rea, Kiera Murphy, Olga Makarova, Sergey Buravkov, Niall P. Hyland, Catherine Stanton, Gerard Clarke, Cormac G.M. Gahan, Timothy G. Dinan, John F. Cryan

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is one of the most prevalent neurodevelopmental conditions worldwide. There is growing awareness that ASD is highly comorbid with gastrointestinal distress and altered intestinal microbiome, and that host-microbiome interactions may contribute to the disease symptoms. However, the paucity of knowledge on gut-brain axis signaling in autism constitutes an obstacle to the development of precision microbiota-based therapeutics in ASD. To this end, we explored the interactions between intestinal microbiota, gut physiology and social behavior in a BTBR T(+)Itpr3(tf)/J mouse model of ASD. Here we show that a reduction in the relative abundance of very particular bacterial taxa in the BTBR gut - namely, bile-metabolizing Bifidobacterium and Blautia species, - is associated with deficient bile acid and tryptophan metabolism in the intestine, marked gastrointestinal dysfunction, as well as impaired social interactions in BTBR mice. Together these data support the concept of targeted manipulation of the gut microbiota for reversing gastrointestinal and behavioral symptomatology in ASD, and offer specific plausible targets in this endeavor.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 134 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 307 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 307 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 56 18%
Researcher 49 16%
Student > Master 43 14%
Student > Bachelor 43 14%
Other 15 5%
Other 44 14%
Unknown 57 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 40 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 39 13%
Neuroscience 39 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 35 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 20 7%
Other 54 18%
Unknown 80 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 84. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 June 2021.
All research outputs
#334,885
of 19,191,572 outputs
Outputs from EBioMedicine
#146
of 2,804 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,158
of 289,224 outputs
Outputs of similar age from EBioMedicine
#6
of 80 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,191,572 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,804 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 289,224 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 80 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.