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The public awareness of stillbirth: an Irish population study

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
85 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
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Title
The public awareness of stillbirth: an Irish population study
Published in
British Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, October 2017
DOI 10.1111/1471-0528.14939
Pubmed ID
Authors

D Nuzum, S Meaney, K O'Donoghue

Abstract

To evaluate the general population's awareness of stillbirth. A cross sectional telephone population survey. A nationally representative sample of the Irish adult population. 999 members of the Irish population selected by random digit dialling. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the odds of identifying risk factors for stillbirth. Public knowledge of incidence, risk factors, causes and social awareness about stillbirth. Only a minority, 17%, of respondents correctly identified the incidence of stillbirth. Men and those aged over 45 were more likely to say they did not know when a stillbirth occurs. Over half, 56% of respondents were unable to identify any stillbirth risk factors. Half of respondents, 53%, believed that the cause of stillbirth was due to a problem with the baby, 39% a problem with the mother, while 31% believed stillbirth occurred as a result of the care provided to the mother. The majority, 79%, believed that all stillbirths should be medically investigated, although women were more likely to suggest this (82% v 76.4% p=0.043). Stillbirth had been represented in traditional and online media for 75% of respondents and 54% said they personally knew someone who had a stillbirth. There is a lack of public knowledge concerning the incidence, risk factors and causes of stillbirth. Improved public health initiatives and antenatal education are warranted to increase awareness of stillbirth risk factors and to improve care and monitoring during pregnancy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 85 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Researcher 4 10%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Other 8 21%
Unknown 6 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 12 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 23%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Linguistics 2 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 7 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 57. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 May 2021.
All research outputs
#538,319
of 20,419,783 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology
#171
of 6,347 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,418
of 292,941 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology
#8
of 91 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,419,783 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,347 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 292,941 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 91 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.