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Social transmission of tool use and tool manufacture in Goffin cockatoos (Cacatua goffini).

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, October 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
17 news outlets
blogs
8 blogs
twitter
33 tweeters
facebook
11 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
102 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Social transmission of tool use and tool manufacture in Goffin cockatoos (Cacatua goffini).
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, October 2014
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2014.0972
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. M. I. Auersperg, A. M. I. von Bayern, S. Weber, A. Szabadvari, T. Bugnyar, A. Kacelnik, Auersperg AM, von Bayern AM, Weber S, Szabadvari A, Bugnyar T, Kacelnik A

Abstract

Tool use can be inherited, or acquired as an individual innovation or by social transmission. Having previously reported individual innovative tool use and manufacture by a Goffin cockatoo, we used the innovator (Figaro, a male) as a demonstrator to investigate social transmission. Twelve Goffins saw either demonstrations by Figaro, or 'ghost' controls where tools and/or food were manipulated using magnets. Subjects observing demonstrations showed greater tool-related performance than ghost controls, with all three males in this group (but not the three females) acquiring tool-using competence. Two of these three males further acquired tool-manufacturing competence. As the actions of successful observers differed from those of the demonstrator, result emulation rather than high-fidelity imitation is the most plausible transmission mechanism.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 33 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 102 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 5%
United Kingdom 3 3%
Canada 2 2%
Germany 2 2%
Sweden 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 85 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 26%
Researcher 18 18%
Student > Bachelor 14 14%
Student > Master 11 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 8%
Other 24 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 53 52%
Psychology 16 16%
Unspecified 11 11%
Neuroscience 6 6%
Arts and Humanities 5 5%
Other 11 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 226. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 July 2017.
All research outputs
#47,368
of 12,268,429 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#106
of 7,183 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#848
of 210,441 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#3
of 114 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,268,429 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,183 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 210,441 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 114 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.